errorist

errorist

(ˈɛrərɪst)
n
one who makes errors
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errorist as seen es of his of eed, ns, and tage of int-Top of the world PILE-UP: Snow jokes BEYOND THE POLE (15, pounds 19.
Rod and Norma Stokes with a picture of their son Christopher, 30, who was killed by at errorist unman in Jordan on Monday
Unlike for the practical t errorist, "No change in the world order will ever content the apocalyptic terrorist, since his actual discontents are internal to himself.
Meanwhile, t errorists fired several mortar shells at thedirection of Harasta highway and al-Qaboun area near Damascus city.
Today's readers may therefore expect to encounter unusual interpretations, for example: that "Galatia is actually a place in Greece" (131); that Paul was asked to remember the poor (Gal 1:10) because they "had sold all their goods" (193); that when Peter was rebuked by Paul (Gal 2:4) he became "a great example of humility" (194); that the Galatians had been bewitched (Gal 3:1) just as "the gaze of a menstruating woman infects the mirror that has been recently cleaned" (217) and they saw Christ's crucifixion because they possessed "the four books of the Gospels" (95); that the troublemakers should be cut off (Gal 5:12) so they cannot produce more errorists "just as severed testicles cannot procreate" (175); that "those who are spiritual" (Gal.
Soon a rebel outfit, the Errorists, help her break out of the Bastille before the rest of her brain is fried and - after an escape reminiscent of the Count of Monte Cristo - she starts to remember elements of her past life as a memory hunter for the Errorists.
A car is hijacked in the South, packed with its lethal cargo which then needs to be driven only a few miles to the chosen target in the North, and before the horror even unfolds the t errorists will be back in the relative safety of their lairs in the Republic.
Fundamental errorists, indeed, ought to be the subjects of uncompromising controversy, and of exclusion from church privileges.