essentialism

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es·sen·tial·ism

 (ĭ-sĕn′shə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophical tenet that objects and classes of objects have essential and not merely accidental characteristics.

es·sen′tial·ist adj.

essentialism

(ɪˈsɛnʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy one of a number of related doctrines which hold that there are necessary properties of things, that these are logically prior to the existence of the individuals which instantiate them, and that their classification depends upon their satisfaction of sets of necessary conditions
2. (Education) the doctrine that education should concentrate on teaching basic skills and encouraging intellectual self-discipline
esˈsentialist n

es•sen•tial•ism

(əˈsɛn ʃəˌlɪz əm)

n.
an educational doctrine advocating the teaching of culturally important concepts, ideals, and skills to all students, regardless of individual ability, needs, etc. Compare progressivism.
[1935–40]
es•sen′tial•ist, n., adj.

essentialism

1. a philosophical theory asserting that metaphysical essences are real and intuitively accessible.
2. a philosophical theory giving priority to the inward nature, true substance, or constitution of something over its existence. Cf. existentialism.essentialist, n.essentialistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations
esencialismus
essentialism