Estates General


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Estates General: Great Fear

Estates General

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) See States General
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Estates General - assembly of the estates of all France; last meeting in 1789
States General - assembly of the estates of an entire country especially the sovereign body of the Dutch republic from 16th to 18th centuries
References in periodicals archive ?
This was done in 1295 with the Model Parliament, in France in 1302 with the Estates General, in Spain in 1476 with the Cortes de Madrigal, in Germany with the 1495 Reichstag, in Russia with the 1549 Zemski Sobor.
At the Estates General in Blois, Henri III had both the duke of Guise and his brother Cardinal Louis assassinated.
In October 1995, Education Minister Jean Garon appointed a Commission for the Estates General on Education (CEGE), which after 16 months of work submitted a report titled Renewing Our Education System: Ten Priority Areas.
Thus, from approximately page 50 onward, Neely provides the story of the decision of the Parlement of Paris that the Estates General should meet in the forms of 1614 favorable to the privileged orders.
Finally in May 1788 he bowed to popular pressure and summoned the Estates General.
In 2001, she collaborated in organizing the Estates General of Neighborhood Women and their publication in 2002 of a national petition, Ni Putes Ni Soumises, "a manifesto of demands" (113) that was initially ignored by politicians and the media.
By the time the Estates General met in 1614, the Jesuits were gaining wider acceptance, and were not the focus of the most heated controversies of the day.
There was nothing comparable to the Estates General of the West for there were no estates.
I became a historian of institutions, specifically the French Estates General of 1614, mainly to stop a faculty member from constantly bugging me about what I was going to do.
Last night Lilburn Estates general manager Ian Hall said: "We have cancelled all our shooting because the rain simply washed us out in June.
In 1774, a French public official warned that "if people believe [Louis XVI] to be a despot, it will be impossible to open loans, or if that route is taken, they will be so costly that England will always finish by having the last &u in any war" Fourteen years later, when the Bourbon monarchy declared bankruptcy and recalled the long-banished Estates General, the point became settled: However many coins may be in his treasure chest, a king can never acquire the credit line needed to finance a modern military without ceding power to "the people.
The important thing is that the gates are to be thrown open; and, while one or two historians will no doubt suck their teeth and mutter darkly about the awful precedent of the French king's decision to summon the Estates General in 1789, others will refuse to believe that this must necessarily lead to revolution and the inevitable installation of Madame La Guillotine in the middle of Portman Square.