esterase

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es·ter·ase

 (ĕs′tə-rās′, -rāz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of an ester.

esterase

(ˈɛstəˌreɪs; -ˌreɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of enzymes that hydrolyse esters into alcohols and acids

es•ter•ase

(ˈɛs təˌreɪs, -ˌreɪz)

n.
any enzyme that hydrolyzes an ester into an alcohol and an acid.
[1915–20]
Translations
estérase
References in periodicals archive ?
esterases (carboxylic ester hydrolases--lipase and phospholipase A2, phosphoric monoester hydrolases--alkaline and acid phosphatase and sulphuric ester hydrolases --sulfatase),
The present study was aimed at determining the possible role of esterases in development of tolerance/resistance in phosphine-tolerant populations.
Urine with a high specific gravity can also cause leucocyte crenation, which can impede the liberation of the esterases.
Coutinho and Henrissat (1999) classified carbohydrate esterases (CE) into 14 groups, with AXEs classified into CE families 1 to 7 based on significant sequence diversity.
Purification and properties of intracellular esterases from Streptococcus thermophilus.
They discuss the taxonomy of these genera and the sister genus Talaromyces; techniques currently used in relation to genomics; a genomic perspective on biological processes of pathogenicity, carbon starvation, sulfur metabolism, feruloyl esterases, secondary metabolism, and pH modulation in these fungi; and an approach to generating targeted mutants using genomics to gain more insight into the mechanism underlying enzyme production.
Host plant species can passively affect the biochemistry of arthropods and one of the most important effects is on the detoxification enzymes involved in insecticide metabolism, including general esterases, glutathione S-transferases, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (e.
05) in the activities of esterases, proteases and cellulases in the gut of termite workers after exposure to kaempferol, gel filtrated fraction, n-Hexane
Particularly, esterases from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may be involved in the development of fruity flavours and the improvement of quality in dairy and meat products like cheese, cured bacon and fermented sausages (Gobbetti et al.
The relationship between aphid resistance to insecticides and esterases has been thoroughly confirmed for several aphid species (Siegfried & Zera, 1994; Devonshire, 1989; Field et al.
Because in the calcein-AM assay the possible ability of test compounds to inhibit esterases might interfere with the measurement of P-gp activity, test compounds were also screened for esterase inhibition.