Eteocles


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Related to Eteocles: Polyneices, Polyneikes

E·te·o·cles

 (ĭ-tē′ə-klēz′)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Oedipus and Jocasta who agreed to reign in Thebes in alternating years with his brother, Polynices, but refused to resign after the first year.

Eteocles

(ɪˈtiːəˌkliːz; ˈɛtɪə-)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a son of Oedipus and Jocasta. He expelled his brother Polynices from Thebes; they killed each other in single combat when Polynices returned as leader of the Seven against Thebes
References in classic literature ?
When they had got as far the deep-meadowed and rush-grown banks of the Aesopus, the Achaeans sent Tydeus as their envoy, and he found the Cadmeans gathered in great numbers to a banquet in the house of Eteocles.
The "Thebais" seems to have begun with the origin of the fatal quarrel between Eteocles and Polyneices in the curse called down upon them by their father in his misery.
ANTIGONE and ISMENE - daughters of Oedipus and sisters of Polyneices and Eteocles.
Polyneices died fighting his brother Eteocles for the throne.
The story of Antigone, a set text at GCSE and A level, centres around the children of Oedipus - Antigone, her sister Ismene and brothers Polynices and Eteocles.
In the drama class, the two patients play Oedipus' sons Eteocles and Polynices, who, as the myth goes, end up killing each other.
42) There is a strong mythological tradition for violence between twins (Girard 1988:65-69): well-known Classical examples are Eteocles and Polyneices, and Romulus and Remus.
Mortals' names are negatively charged since they concern and virtually visualise the disastrous and possibly transgressive moves and intentions both of the alien attackers (5) and, eventually, of Eteocles himself.
In the aftermath of a civil war between a--supposedly loyal--brother Eteocles, and a--supposedly traitorous--brother Polynices, Creon stands for the manmade laws of the state (albeit sanctioned by the gods) in opposition to Antigone's claim to stand for the laws governing family and private life, which she claims are directly ordained by the gods and therefore self-evidently higher than any state law.
Polyneices and his brother Eteocles killed each other in battle, and Creon gives a military funeral to Eteocles, but proclaims Polyneices a traitor and in retribution commands he remain unburied.
From Oedipus' father, Lauis, to his sons, Polyneices and Eteocles, the myth moves from homosexual rape to threatened childlessness and then to incest and the father's deadly curse on his sons.
The Seven Against Thebes told how Polynikes and Eteocles, twin brothers, fought at Thebes, while in the Antigone, which follows the Seven in the myth, Antigone scatters dust on Polynikes' corpse as an act of ritual burial, forbidden by King Kreon.