ethnicity

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eth·nic·i·ty

 (ĕth-nĭs′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. Ethnic character, background, or affiliation.
2. An ethnic group.

eth•nic•i•ty

(ɛθˈnɪs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. ethnic traits, background, allegiance, or association.
2. an ethnic group: Representatives of several ethnicities were present.
[1945–50]

ethnicity

A person’s ethnic background.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethnicity - an ethnic quality or affiliation resulting from racial or cultural tiesethnicity - an ethnic quality or affiliation resulting from racial or cultural ties; "ethnicity has a strong influence on community status relations"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
Translations

ethnicity

[eθˈnɪsɪtɪ] Netnicidad f

ethnicity

[ɛθˈnɪsɪti] nethnicité fethnic minority nminorité f ethnique

ethnicity

n origen étnico, identidad étnica
References in periodicals archive ?
are stopped the least ethnicities White people, on the other hand, saw 16% (26,765) of the 167,229 stopped and searched arrested.
s are stopped the least ethnicities th 16 167 229 stoppe White people, on the other hand, saw 16% (26,765) of the 167,229 stopped and searched arrested.
The role of the state is to engage with ethnicities rather than favor some, or exclude others.
The methodical question then becomes how to (re)construct relevant cultural models for ethnicities that are, in a sense, both fluid and set within contexts obfuscated by the passage of time.
If he is made redundant, this will seriously impact upon the university's ability to effectively teach ethnicities, and suggests a lack of concern in such a key aspect of any sociology course; not to mention the context of an already low number of ethnic minority academics.
Therefore, because of the removal of resident alien as a choice among ethnic categories, the other ethnicities will increase accordingly.
However, much research in New Zealand has shown growth in the number of people reporting multiple ethnicities and changes in the ethnic composition of New Zealand, which may reflect social changes as well as changes in the construct of ethnicity.
Ethnicity covers eighty-eight ethnicities, placed in context by nearly one hundred pages of introduction.
Kazal's work affirms what should be, but what is not obvious to every student of ethnicity: Ethnicities have histories.
Most respondents (73%) were aged 16 or 17; 56% were white, 23% were black, 15% were Hispanic, and 7% reported other races and ethnicities.
14) While contributing to the image of American pluralism and to the articulation of diasporic Islam, Arab Muslims, like Muslims of other ethnicities, faced the stigma of outsiderness.