ethnolinguistic


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ethnolinguistic

(ˌɛθnəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪk)
adj
(Linguistics) relating to ethnolinguistics
References in periodicals archive ?
Feasts of Merit,' which recently opened and will run for a year, analyzes the relationship between social status, wealth and feasting in various ethnolinguistic groups in the Cordillera.
Delimitation is, however, not all about which province gets how many seats in the national legislature; the demarcation of boundaries within provinces and districts can be instrumental in dividing or uniting ethnolinguistic, political or religious groups.
Stability in Afghanistan cannot occur without the support of Pakistan, which has the ethnolinguistic affinity for the Pashtun.
A recent study of Ugandan women from two ethnolinguistic groups (Bantu and Nilotic) revealed differences between the two groups, but both groups were significantly different from American women.
Youth leaders and delegates from various ethnolinguistic groups in the country rendered cultural performances from Muslim tribes like the Iranon, Maranao, Maguindanaon, Sangil, Sama and Tausug.
We also know that these infrastructures of nation-building also operate at smaller scales, helping to create and reproduce ethnolinguistic and other groups--often imagined to reside in a particular territory--within the boundaries of a nation-state (Gal, 2012; Goebel, 2015; Moore, 2011; Pietikainen & Kelly-Holmes, 2013).
Results are discussed using ethnolinguistic vitality and the Interactive Acculturation Model with implications for harmony and social cohesion between Francophone and Anglophone communities within Canada's "Bilingual Belt".
77-78) and the Extended GIDS or EGIDS (Lewis and Simons 2010);4 subjective ethnolinguistic vitality (Allard and Landry 1986); Hornberger's language planning goals (Hornberger 1994, p.
1987) Ethnolinguistic identity theory: A social psychological approach to language maintenance.
Furthermore, most of these studies have been limited to the ethnolinguistic and religious fractionalisation.
The small population known today in Brunei as "Dusun," together with related groups generally known as "Bisaya" in southwestern Sabah, on Labuan Island, and in the Limbang district of Sarawak appear to be all that remains of what, in the sixteenth century, was a major ethnolinguistic group present at the time in small, largely autonomous riverine settlements surrounding Brunei Bay.
To cause additional complications, many states have internal systems of zoning where informal rules state that the governor, the speaker of the state house of assembly and the minister must be from different regions or ethnolinguistic groups in the state.