ethnolinguistics


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Related to ethnolinguistics: descriptive linguistics

ethnolinguistics

(ˌɛθnəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) (functioning as singular) a field of anthropological linguistics which deals with the study of the languages of particular ethnic groups and the relationships between language and culture
Translations
etnolingvistiikka

ethnolinguistics

[ˌeθnəʊlɪŋˈgwɪstɪks] Netnolingüística f
References in periodicals archive ?
Gunn's investigation of these issues gets off to a slow start, with a lengthy first chapter that sketches the outlines of early nineteenth-century ethnolinguistics.
In modern and contemporary linguistics, ethnolinguistics has little place.
Venz's research interests include Austronesian languages and cultures, historical linguistics, the anthropology of religion, cognitive anthropology and ethnolinguistics.
The study of "language use within speech communities" is the domain of ethnolinguistics and sociolinguistics (Bonvillan 2000, 4).
INTRODUCTION: ETHNOLINGUISTICS AND CULTURAL CONCEPTS: Hatred/ Hate is defined as a deep seated extreme emotional dislike, the word "emotional" giving an affective undertone to the feeling state.
25) This is subject matter encompassed by cognitive ethnolinguistics, which is intensively being developed by the Lublin ethnolinguistic school, headed by J.
Currents in Pacific Linguistics: Papers on Austronesian languages and ethnolinguistics in honour of George W.
Keywords: Ethnolinguistics, Mapudungun, linguistics vitality, social representations.
From their perspectives in archaeology, archaeolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, and bioanthropology they explore such topics as migration in fluid social landscapes, movement and the unsettling of the Pueblos, using cognitive semantics to relate Mesa Verde archaeology to modern Pueblo languages, loanword histories and the demography of migration, migration in anthropological genetics, and evolutionary models of migration in human prehistory and their anthropological significance.
Following a theoretical and methodological approach derived from anthropology, ethnolinguistics and history of art, this research note engages a reflection on sociocultural issues that are inherent to the use of Internet within the contemporary artistic domain in the Canadian Arctic.
Winkelmann brings together ethnolinguistics and Bakhtin's dialogism to analyze the religious language of battered women living in a shelter in the Upper South.