ethnonym

(redirected from Ethnonyms)

eth·no·nym

 (ĕth′nō-nĭm′)
n.
The name of a people or ethnic group.

eth′no·nym′ic adj.

ethnonym

(ˈɛθnəˌnɪm)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the name of an ethnic group

eth•no•nym

(ˈɛθ noʊ nɪm)
n.
the name of a tribe, people, or ethnic group.
[1960–65; ethn (o)- + -onym]
References in periodicals archive ?
To "exonym" and "autonym" we have to add "loconym," an ethnonym based on a toponym, and "paleonym" and "neonym," both referring to the fact that some ethnonyms can be analyzed in their diachronic dimension: some archaic ethnonyms ("paleonyms") can be replaced by new ones ("neonyms") (1).
And why is it not a compelling issue with regard to (say) the notion of Germany or Vietnam whose success in their own struggles for national supremacy similarly gave their respective ethnonyms to their countries?
In daily practice, people do not necessarily refer to themselves regularly by the ethnonyms that outsiders apply to them.
2001 "Sea Dayak" and "Iban": The History of two Ethnonyms.
The current official list of ethnonyms in Vietnam comprises 54 entries; see Dang Nghiem Van et al.
Some have tried to connect the name with the Boddhisattva Manjusri, but there is no precedent for using Buddhist deities' names as ethnonyms, either among the Mongols or the Jurchen.
It appears that the use of alternative ethnonyms, across different languages boundaries (both exonyms and endonyms, nicknames, etc.
This paper attempts to compare models in their contexts, but I do not mean to say that the ethnonyms I use precisely denote this context.
Ethnonyms, ethnic identities, and ethnic groups', American Ethnologist, 24, 1 (1997): 92.
Penglin Wang, "A Linguistic Approach to Inner Asian Ethnonyms," in The Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Peoples of Eastern Central Asia, ed.
Long Batan" literally means 'the confluence of the Batan (river)' and, as seen here, place names, which amount to ethnonyms, are part of a vernacular system of ethnic classification that also indicates the attributes of longhouses.
The local ethnonyms of Wunpawng or Jinghpaw have been promoted as more appropriate terms.