right whale

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right whale

n.
Any of several large baleen whales of the family Balaenidae, characterized by a large head with an arched upper jaw and absence of a dorsal fin.

[Because it was the "right" whale to kill.]

right whale

n
(Animals) any large whalebone whale of the family Balaenidae. They are grey or black, have a large head, and, in most, no dorsal fin, and are hunted as a source of whalebone and oil. See also bowhead
[C19: perhaps so named because it was right for hunting]

right′ whale`


n.
any of several large whalebone whales of the genus Balaena, of circumpolar seas.
[1715–25; allusion unclear]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.right whale - large Arctic whalebone whaleright whale - large Arctic whalebone whale; allegedly the `right' whale to hunt because of its valuable whalebone and oil
baleen whale, whalebone whale - whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the stations took a mix (often seasonally determined) of both species as well as right whales, Eubalaena japonica, whenever an opportunity became available.
The suggested Eubalaena (whale genus) Oculina National Marine Sanctuary was nominated to the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries on Sept.
Modern whalers also found new populations of sperm whales, Physeter macrocephalus, to hunt and also took southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, when they were encountered.
Kelp Gulls, Larus dominicanus, are parasites on flesh of Right whale, Eubalaena australis.
Today, roughly 400 Eubalaena glacialis remain, living along the coast of North America.
1996) also refer to a highly improbable occurrence of the northern right whale Eubalaena glacialis in the Azores.
In 1996 it was proposed that both the inshore and offshore sectors of the Mid-Atlantic and Gulf of Maine lobster pot/trap fisheries be reclassified from Category III to Category I under the MMPA because of interactions with marine mammals, specifically the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale, Eubalaena glacialis (NOAA, 1995).
Monitoring North Atlantic right whale Eubalaena glacialis entanglement rates: a 30 yr retrospective.
Two other species that suffered significant impacts from the Soviet catches in the North Pacific were the right whale, Eubalaena japonica, and the bowhead whale, Balaena mysticetus, both of which had already been overexploited by historical (sail-based) whaling beginning in the mid-1800's (Clapham et al.
These catches, together with the poorly regulated whaling of other nations, drastically reduced the populations concerned, and in at least one case (that of the eastern population of the North Pacific right whale, Eubalaena japonica), may have irreversibly damaged a population's chance of recovery.