Europa


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Eu·ro·pa

 (yo͝o-rō′pə)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A Phoenician princess abducted to Crete by Zeus, who had assumed the form of a white bull, and by him the mother of Minos, Rhadamanthus, and Sarpedon.
2. One of the four brightest satellites of Jupiter. It was originally sighted by Galileo.

[Latin Eurōpa, from Greek Eurōpē.]

Europa

(jʊˈrəʊpə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Phoenician princess who had three children by Zeus in Crete, where he had taken her after assuming the guise of a white bull. Their offspring were Rhadamanthus, Minos, and Sarpedon

Europa

(jʊˈrəʊpə)
n
(Celestial Objects) the smallest of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter. Diameter: 3138 km; orbital radius: 671 000 km

Eu•ro•pa

(yʊˈroʊ pə, yə-)

n.
1. (in Greek myth) a sister of Cadmus who was abducted by Zeus in the form of a bull.
2. a large moon of the planet Jupiter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Europa - the 4th largest of Jupiter's satellites; covered with a smooth shell of frozen water
Translations
EurópaEurópé

Europa

[jʊˈrəʊpə] n (Myth) → Europa
References in classic literature ?
Cadmus, Phoenix, and Cilix, the three sons of King Agenor, and their little sister Europa (who was a very beautiful child), were at play together near the seashore in their father's kingdom of Phoenicia.
Europa, who was a little wearied with playing all day long, did not chase the butterfly with her brothers, but sat still where they had left her, and closed her eyes.
Europa and her brothers had been a long time playing in the meadow, and had seen no cattle, nor other living thing, either there or on the neighboring hills.
cried Europa, starting up out of the midst of the roses and lilies.
Nevertheless, it was the suddenness with which she had perceived the bull, rather than anything frightful in his appearance, that caused Europa so much alarm.
Thus, frightened as she at first was, you might by and by have seen Europa stroking the bull's forehead with her small white hand, and taking the garlands off her own head to hang them on his neck and ivory horns.
When the animal saw (for the bull had so much intelligence that it is really wonderful to think of), when he saw that Europa was no longer afraid of him, he grew overjoyed, and could hardly contain himself for delight.
And not only did the bull bend his neck, he absolutely knelt down at her feet, and made such intelligent nods, and other inviting gestures, that Europa understood what he meant just as well as if he had put it in so many words.
At the first thought of such a thing, Europa drew back.
Making one bound(for this little princess was as active as a squirrel), there sat Europa on the beautiful bull, holding an ivory horn in each hand, lest she should fall off.
Not the white bull Jupiter swimming away with ravished Europa clinging to his graceful horns; his lovely, leering eyes sideways intent upon the maid; with smooth bewitching fleetness, rippling straight for the nuptial bower in Crete; not Jove, not that great majesty Supreme
15) who with the lord Apollo and the Rivers have youths in their keeping -- to this charge Zeus appointed them -- Peitho, and Admete, and Ianthe, and Electra, and Doris, and Prymno, and Urania divine in form, Hippo, Clymene, Rhodea, and Callirrhoe, Zeuxo and Clytie, and Idyia, and Pasithoe, Plexaura, and Galaxaura, and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe and handsome Polydora, Cerceis lovely of form, and soft eyed Pluto, Perseis, Ianeira, Acaste, Xanthe, Petraea the fair, Menestho, and Europa, Metis, and Eurynome, and Telesto saffron-clad, Chryseis and Asia and charming Calypso, Eudora, and Tyche, Amphirho, and Ocyrrhoe, and Styx who is the chiefest of them all.