joule

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joule

 (jo͞ol, joul)
n. Abbr. J or j
1. The International System unit of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy.
2.
a. A unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere is passed through a resistance of one ohm for one second.
b. A unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of one newton acts through a distance of one meter. See Table at measurement.

[After James Prescott Joule.]

Joule

(dʒuːl)
n
(Biography) James Prescott. 1818–89, English physicist, who evaluated the mechanical equivalent of heat and contributed to the study of heat and electricity

joule

(dʒuːl)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of work or energy; the work done when the point of application of a force of 1 newton is displaced through a distance of 1 metre in the direction of the force. 1 joule is equivalent to 1 watt-second, 107 ergs, 0.2390 calories, or 0.738 foot-pound. Symbol: J
[C19: named after James Prescott Joule]

joule

(dʒul, dʒaʊl)

n.
the SI unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one newton when its point of application moves through a distance of one meter in the direction of the force. Abbr.: J, j
[1885–90; after J. P. Joule]

Joule

(dʒul, dʒaʊl)

n.
James Prescott, 1818–89, English physicist.

joule

(jo͞ol, joul)
A unit used to measure energy or work. One joule is equal to the work done when a force of one newton acts over a distance of one meter.

joule

1. A unit of work or energy transfer. One joule is equal to work done by a force of one newton moved about 1 m in the direction of the force.
2. (J) A unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of one newton is applied through a distance of one meter. Used instead of calorie: 1 J = 0.239 cal. Named after the British physicist J.P. Joule (1818–89).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.joule - a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one secondjoule - a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second
energy unit, heat unit, work unit - a unit of measurement for work
erg - a cgs unit of work or energy; the work done by a force of one dyne acting over a distance of one centimeter
2.Joule - English physicist who established the mechanical theory of heat and discovered the first law of thermodynamics (1818-1889)
Translations
joule

joule

[dʒuːl] Njulio m, joule m

joule

[ˈdʒuːl] njoule m

joule

n (Phys) → Joule nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, the study predicts that the annual demand for hydrogen could increase tenfold by 2050 to almost 80 exajoules (EJ) in 2050, meeting 18 per cent of total final energy demand in the 2050 two-degree scenario.
CEM analysis shows that implementation of the ISO 50001 standard across the commercial and industrial sectors globally could drive cumulative energy savings of approximately 62 exajoules by 2030, sparing nearly USD 600 billion in energy costs and avoiding 6 500 million metric tonnes of CO2 emissions.
In 2010, the building sector consumed approximately 117 exajoules (111 quad) or 32% of global final energy consumption, 30% of energy-related carbon dioxide (C[O.
4 exajoules (EJ) of energy (DOE 2011a) compared to 550.
The total solar power absorbed by Earth's atmosphere, landmasses and oceans is almost 3,850,000 exajoules (EJ) per year.
In these countries since 1974, as a result of energy efficiency investments, 63 exajoules (ex) of energy consumption was avoided, more than 1.