Excuse me


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ex·cuse

 (ĭk-skyo͞oz′)
tr.v. ex·cused, ex·cus·ing, ex·cus·es
1.
a. To make allowance for; overlook or forgive: Please excuse the interruption.
b. To grant pardon to; forgive: We quickly excused the latecomer.
2.
a. To apologize for (oneself) for an act that could cause offense: She excused herself for being late.
b. To explain (a fault or offense) in the hope of being forgiven or understood; try to justify: He arrived late and excused his tardiness by blaming it on the traffic. See Synonyms at forgive.
3. To serve as justification for: Witty talk does not excuse bad manners.
4. To free, as from an obligation or duty; exempt: She was excused from jury duty because she knew the plaintiff.
5. To give permission to leave; release: The child ate quickly and asked to be excused.
n. (ĭk-skyo͞os′)
1. An explanation offered to justify or obtain forgiveness.
2. A reason or grounds for excusing: Ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.
3. The act of excusing.
4. A note explaining an absence.
5. Informal An inferior example: a poor excuse for a poet; a sorry excuse for a car.
Idiom:
Excuse me
1. Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
2. Used to request that a statement be repeated.

[Middle English excusen, from Old French excuser, from Latin excūsāre : ex-, ex- + causa, accusation; see cause.]

ex·cus′a·ble adj.
ex·cus′a·ble·ness n.
ex·cus′a·bly adv.
ex·cus′er n.
Translations
promiňtes dovolením
undskyld
ببخشید
anteeksi
kérem?
すみません
poftim
Excuse me   
References in classic literature ?
Now is my time to make peace with this gallant man," said D'Artagnan to himself, having stood on one side during the whole of the latter part of the conversation; and with this good feeling drawing near to Aramis, who was departing without paying any attention to him, "Monsieur," said he, "you will excuse me, I hope.
himself said frequently that although well educated in the neighbourhood of Blackheath at as high as eighty guineas which is a good deal for parents and the plate kept back too on going away but that is more a meanness than its value that he had learnt more in his first years as a commercial traveller with a large commission on the sale of an article that nobody would hear of much less buy which preceded the wine trade a long time than in the whole six years in that academy conducted by a college Bachelor, though why a Bachelor more clever than a married man I do not see and never did but pray excuse me that is not the point.
You must excuse me, indeed you must excuse me," cried Fanny, growing more and more red from excessive agitation, and looking distressfully at Edmund, who was kindly observing her; but unwilling to exasperate his brother by interference, gave her only an encouraging smile.