addiction

(redirected from Exercise Addiction)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ad·dic·tion

 (ə-dĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. A condition involving use of a substance, such as a drug or alcohol, or engagement in a behavior, such as gambling, in which a person has strong cravings, is unable to stop or limit the activity, continues the activity despite harmful consequences, and experiences distress upon discontinuance: a drug used in the treatment of heroin addiction.
b. An instance of this: a person with a sex addiction.
2.
a. The condition of being habitually occupied with or involved in something: addiction to romance novels.
b. The condition of using something on a regular or dependent basis: fossil fuel addiction.
c. An instance of one of these conditions: had an addiction to fast cars.

addiction

(əˈdɪkʃən)
n
the condition of being abnormally dependent on some habit, esp compulsive dependency on narcotic drugs

ad•dic•tion

(əˈdɪk ʃən)

n.
dependence on or commitment to a habit, practice, or habit-forming substance to the extent that its cessation causes trauma.
[1595–1605; < Latin]

ad·dic·tion

(ə-dĭk′shən)
1. A physical or psychological need for a habit-forming substance, such as drugs or alcohol.
2. A habitual or compulsive involvement in an activity, such as gambling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.addiction - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)addiction - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)
narcotic - a drug that produces numbness or stupor; often taken for pleasure or to reduce pain; extensive use can lead to addiction
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
drug addiction, white plague - an addiction to a drug (especially a narcotic drug)
2.addiction - an abnormally strong cravingaddiction - an abnormally strong craving  
craving - an intense desire for some particular thing
3.addiction - (Roman law) a formal award by a magistrate of a thing or person to another person (as the award of a debtor to his creditor)addiction - (Roman law) a formal award by a magistrate of a thing or person to another person (as the award of a debtor to his creditor); a surrender to a master; "under Roman law addiction was the justification for slavery"
award, awarding - a grant made by a law court; "he criticized the awarding of compensation by the court"
jus civile, Justinian code, Roman law, civil law - the legal code of ancient Rome; codified under Justinian; the basis for many modern systems of civil law

addiction

noun
2. (with to) love of, passion for, attachment to, affection for, fondness for, zeal for, fervour for, ardour for I suddenly discovered an addiction to housework.
Quotations
"Every form of addiction is bad, no matter whether the narcotic be alcohol or morphine or idealism" [Carl Gustav Jung Memories, Dreams, and Reflections]
Translations
إدْمَان
závislost
afhængighed
függés
fíkniávani
závislosť
zasvojenost
bağımlılıktiryakilik

addiction

[əˈdɪkʃən] N
1. (to drugs, alcohol) → adicción f, dependencia f
his addiction to drugssu adicción a or dependencia de las drogassu drogodependencia
heroin addictionadicción f a or dependencia f de la heroína, heroinomanía f
2. (fig) → adicción f
his addiction to TV soapssu adicción a las telenovelas

addiction

[əˈdɪkʃən] ndépendance f
addiction to nicotine → dépendance à la nicotine
drug addiction → toxicomanie f

addiction

nSucht f(to nach); (no pl: = state of dependence) → Sucht f, → Süchtigkeit f; addiction to drugs/alcoholRauschgift-/Trunksucht f; addiction to sportübermäßige Sportbegeisterung; to become an addictionzur Sucht werden

addiction

[əˈdɪkʃn] nassuefazione f (Med) → tossicomania
drug addiction → tossicodipendenza
to have an addiction to chocolate → essere cioccolato-dipendente

addict

(ˈӕdikt) noun
a person who has become dependent on something, especially drugs. a drug addict; a television addict.
adˈdicted adjective
(often with to) dependent on (especially a drug). He is addicted to alcohol.
adˈdiction (-ʃən) noun

ad·dic·tion

n. adicción, propensión, dependencia.

addiction

n adicción f; drug — drogadicción f; heroin — adicción a la heroína
References in periodicals archive ?
Exercise addiction in CrossFit: Prevalence and psychometric properties of the Exercise Addiction Inventory.
Psychometric properties of the Exercise Addiction Inventory (EAI) in a sample of brazilian university students
Monte Nido, based in Malibu, California, is a provider of treatment for eating disorders and exercise addiction to adults and adolescents.
And certainly for gaining some sense of control of your life it beats exercise addiction and eating disorders.
En la actualidad, para evaluar los problemas con la adiccion al ejercicio se dispone de pruebas generales como son The Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire (OEQ) de Pasman y Thompson (1988); The Exercise Dependence Questionnaire (EDQ) de Ogden, Vaele y Summers (1997); The Exercise Dependence Scale (EDS) de Hausenblas y Downs (2002a, 2002b); The Exercise Commitment Survey (ECS) de Garman, Hayduk, Crider y Hodel (2004); The Exercise Addiction Inventory (EAI) de Terry, Szabo y Griffiths (2004) y The Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised (EDS-R) de Downs, Hausenblas y Nigg (2004) traducida y adaptada al castellano por Sicilia y Gonzalez-Cutre (2011).
To date, research on this topic has identified similarities between exercise addiction and drug addiction (Davis, 2000; Sussman et al.
Addictions can include, but are not limited to, drug abuse, exercise addiction, food addiction, sexual addiction, computer addiction, and gambling.
In terms of addictive exercise, the Exercise Addiction Inventory (EAI; Terry, Szabo, & Griffiths, 2004) is an empirically-based, six-item screening tool that uses a five point Likert scale (ranging from 1 = Strongly Disagree to 5 = Strongly Agree).
A LEADING eating disorders campaigner has called for an investigation into the phenomenon of exercise addiction.
ACTRESS Terri Dwyer found fame T on Channel 4's Hollyoaks, but she says her exercise addiction at one time threatened to spiral out of control.
Based on Hall's (1995) proposal that imagery might be linked to exercise addiction, Rodgers, Hall, Blanchard, and Munroe (2001) investigated the relationship between imagery and obligatory exercisers.
Responses of competitive athletes to lay-offs in training: Exercise addiction or psychological relief?