Exeter


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Related to Exeter: Phillips Exeter Academy

Ex·e·ter

 (ĕk′sĭ-tər)
A borough of southwest England northeast of Plymouth. It has been important since Roman times because of its strategic location.

Exeter

(ˈɛksɪtə)
n
(Placename) a city in SW England, administrative centre of Devon; university (1955). Pop: 106 772 (2001)

Ex•e•ter

(ˈɛk sɪ tər)

n.
a city in Devonshire, in SW England. 105,100.
References in classic literature ?
You come to me not alone as agent of my friend Peter Hawkins, of Exeter, to tell me all about my new estate in London.
He never went to Exeter Hall, or heard a popular preacher, or read Tracts for the Times or Sartor Resartus.
Well, Penn an' he they ran the farm - up Exeter way, 'twuz.
Kadlu traded the rich, creamy, twisted narwhal horn and musk-ox teeth (these are just as valuable as pearls) to the Southern Inuit, and they, in turn, traded with the whalers and the missionary-posts of Exeter and Cumberland Sounds; and so the chain went on, till a kettle picked up by a ship's cook in the Bhendy Bazaar might end its days over a blubber-lamp somewhere on the cool side of the Arctic Circle.
There was a numerous family; but the only two grown up, excepting Charles, were Henrietta and Louisa, young ladies of nineteen and twenty, who had brought from school at Exeter all the usual stock of accomplishments, and were now like thousands of other young ladies, living to be fashionable, happy, and merry.
And so it happened that an hour or so later I found myself in the corner of a first-class carriage flying along en route for Exeter, while Sherlock Holmes, with his sharp, eager face framed in his ear-flapped travelling-cap, dipped rapidly into the bundle of fresh papers which he had procured at Paddington.
She promised that she would come and see him sometimes, and that she would never forget him; and she told him about the country he was going to and about her own home in Devonshire--her father kept a turnpike on the high-road that led to Exeter, and there were pigs in the sty, and there was a cow, and the cow had just had a calf--till Philip forgot his tears and grew excited at the thought of his approaching journey.
We learnt, afterwards, that the train we had come by was really the Exeter mail, and that they had spent hours at Waterloo, looking for it, and nobody knew what had become of it.
Lydgate, that he will compare with any preacher in this kingdom, not to speak of this town, which is but a low standard to go by; at least, to my thinking, for I was born and bred at Exeter.
My state of depression would have gratified the most exacting of Methodists; and my penitent face would have made my fortune if I could only have been exhibited by a reformatory association on the platform of Exeter Hall.
Here came the merchandise of all the fair countries which are watered by the Garonne and the Dordogne--the cloths of the south, the skins of Guienne, the wines of the Medoc--to be borne away to Hull, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.
Having at length gone through the school at Taunton, I was thence removed to Exeter College in Oxford, where I remained four years; at the end of which an accident took me off entirely from my studies; and hence, I may truly date the rise of all which happened to me afterwards in life.