exigent

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ex·i·gent

 (ĕk′sə-jənt)
adj.
1. Requiring immediate action; pressing: an exigent need. See Synonyms at urgent.
2. Having or making urgent demands; demanding: "Some citizens ... seized the offending material and made a bonfire of it ... to the gratification of an exigent crowd" (Garry Wills).

[Latin exigēns, exigent-, present participle of exigere, to demand; see exact.]

ex′i·gent·ly adv.

exigent

(ˈɛksɪdʒənt)
adj
1. urgent; pressing
2. exacting; demanding
[C15: from Latin exigere to drive out, weigh out, from agere to drive, compel]
ˈexigently adv

ex•i•gent

(ˈɛk sɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. requiring immediate action or aid; urgent; pressing.
2. requiring a great deal, or more than is reasonable.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin exigent-, s. of exigēns, present participle of exigere to drive out, demand; see exact]
ex′i•gent•ly, adv.

exigent

- A good word to write on letters or packages, since everyone else writes "urgent" or "rush."
See also related terms for rush.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exigent - demanding attention; "clamant needs"; "a crying need"; "regarded literary questions as exigent and momentous"- H.L.Mencken; "insistent hunger"; "an instant need"
imperative - requiring attention or action; "as nuclear weapons proliferate, preventing war becomes imperative"; "requests that grew more and more imperative"
2.exigent - requiring precise accuracy; "an exacting job"; "became more exigent over his pronunciation"
demanding - requiring more than usually expected or thought due; especially great patience and effort and skill; "found the job very demanding"; "a baby can be so demanding"

exigent

adjective
1. Compelling immediate attention:
2. Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength:
Translations
égetőigényeskövetelőkövetelődzősürgős

exigent

[ˈeksɪdʒənt] ADJexigente; (= urgent) → urgente

exigent

adj (= urgent)zwingend, dringend; (= exacting) masterstreng, gestreng (old)
References in periodicals archive ?
141 (2013), to argue that the dissipation of alcohol from the bloodstream is not an emergency that can be considered an exigent circumstance because, although dissipation threatens the destruction of evidence, retrograde extrapolation allows a defendants blood alcohol content at the time of the offense to be calculated from a sample taken many hours later.
In McNeely the Supreme Court determined that a search of a potentially impaired driver was not a per se exigent circumstance authorizing a warrantless search, despite the well-known scientific evidence relating to the dissipation of alcohol concentration in a subject's blood over time.
88) Some of these courts have explicitly stated that Schmerber held that this "special fact" creates a "single-factor exigent circumstance," which permits such a blood draw.
Finally, remember one reason for a backup is it allows you to arm someone you trust, who desperately needs a gun but doesn't have their own, during an exigent circumstance.
One controversial exigent circumstance which has been accepted is that bit about destruction of evidence.
The court permitted warrantless arrest for DUI not committed in the presence of officers, but it specifically noted that the on-going danger posed by DUI was an exigent circumstance.
The commission finds that the Postal Service has shown the recent recession to be an exigent circumstance but it has failed both to quantify the impact of the recession on its Finances and to who show its rate request relates to the resulting loss of mail volume," Goldway said.
is arguably in a constantly exigent circumstance (as distinguished from another city of similar size).
Likewise, family members with relatives on active duty have the right to take off time from work when exigent circumstance arises.
The Court determined that an exigent circumstance created by the arrival of law enforcement officers at a residence does not negate the emergency warrant exception.
When dangerous items are left exposed in an area to which the public at large has access and in an area that police have not secured, public incompetence in dealing with such situations is the exigent circumstance that justifies immediate questioning by police.
73) The exigent circumstance likely to result from a "knock and talk" is the destruction of evidence.