experientialist

experientialist

(ɪkˌspɪərɪˈɛnʃəlɪst)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy an advocate of experientialism
References in periodicals archive ?
Cara is an experientialist - more feet in the fire.
She says: "Cara is an experientialist - more feet in the fire.
JASON ROGERS, "On the Epistemic Relevance of Perceptual Experience: A Defense of Experientialist Intemalism.
There are claims which argue that it arises from "the experientialist position of semantic theory" (Freeman 1996:281).
Generic Structures, Generic Experiences: A Cognitive Experientialist Approach to Video Game Analysis.
prefer, one can spot the odd experientialist, wearing a pair of Tod's
The assumption that embodiment shapes cultural meaning-making activities like interpretation underlies Lakoff and Johnson's experientialist epistemology (see Lakoff and Johnson; Hart) as well as "biocultural" or "consilient" approaches to cultural artifacts: since mental processes--including cultural meanings and evaluations--are grounded in biochemical processes, which in turn reflect a deep history of natural selection, culture must be in some way related to the make-up of human bodies.
Part I reviews the philosophical literature, seeking to clarify crucial distinctions that are all too often blurred by SWB scholars: between well-being and a particular, experientialist, conception of well-being (for example, the view that well-being is just happiness); between the satisfaction of someone's preferences (how well actual conditions in the world fit with her preference ranking) and the fact that the individual feels satisfied: between utility in the traditional economic sense, a measure of preference satisfaction, and experience utility, a measure of the individual's happiness, positive affects, or feelings of satisfaction.
The members of this group may all be characterized as experientialist mystics.
That is, the experientialist view and the consequentialist perspective posses a degree of complimentarity in an integrated whole.
Harvey Cox has described what he called the tension between the experientialist and fundamentalist impulses of Pentecostals, (24) a tension that had a felt impact on the movement's treatment of women, on its increasingly narrow interpretation of the "full gospel," (25) and, for our purposes, on the silencing of its ecumenical values and activities.

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