mitigating circumstances

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mitigating circumstances

pl n
(Law) circumstances that may be considered to lessen the culpability of an offender

mitigating circumstances

Factors that may be considered as lessening the extent to which an accused person is culpable.
Translations

mitigating circumstances

[ˈmɪtɪˌgeɪtɪŋˈsɜːkəmstənsɪz] nplcircostanze fpl attenuanti
References in classic literature ?
He was convicted, but with extenuating circumstances, and condemned to hard labour in Siberia for fifteen years.
Miss Bennet was the only creature who could suppose there might be any extenuating circumstances in the case, unknown to the society of Hertfordshire; her mild and steady candour always pleaded for allowances, and urged the possibility of mistakes-- but by everybody else Mr.
And in the end the criminal was, in consideration of extenuating circumstances, condemned to penal servitude in the second class for a term of eight years only.
But I told her she must bear this cross; that while by law and custom she certainly was entitled to both the man's life and his property, there were extenuating circumstances, and so in Arthur the king's name I had pardoned him.
At once ferocious and maudlin, I was made to murder my uncle with no extenuating circumstances whatever; Millwood put me down in argument, on every occasion; it became sheer monomania in my master's daughter to care a button for me; and all I can say for my gasping and procrastinating conduct on the fatal morning, is, that it was worthy of the general feebleness of my character.
I think it was the worst thing I did; yet there were extenuating circumstances.
I merely say that there were extenuating circumstances.
I shall bring that forward as an extenuating circumstance," replied Eugenie.
If there are extenuating circumstances that prevent you from including a copy of the original text at the time of your submission, please note that in the cover letter.
The mandatory sentence is an extreme punishment and judges should consider all extenuating circumstances.
Because a trip to England is still a necessity, those with extenuating circumstances or without sufficient financial resources will see little practical benefit from this change in English policy.
Also, in having decided to step on the image of Jesus to save some Japanese Christians from torture and death, the young priest likely had a false conscience but a good conscience because of the extraordinary extenuating circumstances that confronted him.