extirp

extirp

(ɛksˈtɜːp)
vb (tr)
to uproot (vegetation), to extirpate
References in periodicals archive ?
English was originally brought to Wales by incomers who, having first subdued us by military occupation, resorted to Acts of Parliament, the law courts and a viciously oppressive educational system to force their language upon us and to extirp ours.
Potamogeton pulcher (spotted pondweed), presumed to be an extirp ated species, was found by Wilhelm (1990).
In the midst of these invasions was an all-out assault on British learning and record-keeping: "the sacrilegious wrack / Of many a noble Booke, as impious hands should sack / The Center, to extirp all knowledge, and exile / All brave and ancient things, for ever from this Ile" (337-40).
Of lechery Lucio maintains that "it is impossible to extirp it quite, friar, till eating and drinking be put down" (102-3).