fir


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FIR

abbr.
far-infrared radiation

fir

 (fûr)
n.
1.
a. Any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies, having linear flattened needles and erect cones with deciduous scales.
b. Any of several similar or related trees, such as the Douglas fir.
2. The wood of any these trees.

[Middle English firre, probably of Scandinavian origin; see perkwu- in Indo-European roots.]

fir′ry adj.

fir

(fɜː)
n
1. (Plants) any pyramidal coniferous tree of the N temperate genus Abies, having single needle-like leaves and erect cones: family Pinaceae. See also red fir, silver fir, balsam fir
2. (Plants) any of various other trees of the family Pinaceae, such as the Douglas fir
3. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees
[Old English furh; related to Old Norse fura, Old High German foraha fir, Latin quercus oak]

fir

(fɜr)

n.
1. any evergreen tree of the genus Abies, of the pine family, having flat needles and erect cones.
2. the wood of such a tree.
[1250–1300; Middle English firre, Old English fyrh]
click for a larger image
fir
Douglas firs can attain heights of more than 200 feet (61 meters).

fir

(fûr)
Any of various evergreen trees that have flat needles and bear cones. Firs generally grow in northern regions or at higher altitudes.
pine, fir, spruce - Pine, fir, and spruce are quite different from each other, though they are all conifers; pine has clusters of long, needle-shaped leaves, spruce is a type of fir, and the only scientific difference between the two is that spruces have rectangular needles while firs have flat, needle-shaped leaves.
See also related terms for pine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fir - nonresinous wood of a fir treefir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree  
fir tree, true fir, fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
douglas fir - strong durable timber of a douglas fir
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abiesfir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
Abies, genus Abies - true firs
fir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree
silver fir - any of various true firs having leaves white or silvery white beneath
Abies bracteata, Abies venusta, bristlecone fir, Santa Lucia fir - a pyramidal fir of southwestern California having spiny pointed leaves and cone scales with long spines
fir cone - the seed-producing cone of a fir tree
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
Translations
تَنّوب، شَجَرَة الميلاد
jedle
grangrantræ
abio
nulg
pihta
jela
erdeifenyõfenyő
òinur
eglė
egle
brad
jedľa
jelka

fir

[fɜːʳ]
A. N (also fir tree) → abeto m
B. CPD fir cone Npiña f

fir

[ˈfɜːr] fir tree nsapin m

fir

nTanne f; (= wood)Tanne (→ nholz nt) f

fir

[fɜːʳ] n (also fir tree) → abete m

fir

(fəː) noun
a kind of evergreen tree that bears cones (ˈfir-cones) and is often grown for its wood.
References in classic literature ?
Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other we looked over a gate at our master's house, which stood by the roadside; at the top of the meadow was a grove of fir trees, and at the bottom a running brook overhung by a steep bank.
Now I'm going to tuck you up in the shawl and give you the fir pillow, and while you sleep I am going down on the shore and write a fairy story for you.
It had no park, but the pleasure-grounds were tolerably extensive; and like every other place of the same degree of importance, it had its open shrubbery, and closer wood walk, a road of smooth gravel winding round a plantation, led to the front, the lawn was dotted over with timber, the house itself was under the guardianship of the fir, the mountain-ash, and the acacia, and a thick screen of them altogether, interspersed with tall Lombardy poplars, shut out the offices.
This time, I remembered I was lying in the oak closet, and I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement.
The bases of the mountains forming the gorge in which the little village lay, were richly green; and high above this gentler vegetation, grew forests of dark fir, cleaving the wintry snow-drift, wedge-like, and stemming the avalanche.
They lived with their Mother in a sand-bank, underneath the root of a very big fir tree.
And the poor soldier went to the acacia; but when he was a few steps from it, the countess looked at him, as if defying him, although a slight expression of fear seemed to flicker in her eye; then, with a single bound she sprang from the acacia to a laburnum, and thence to a Norway fir, where she darted from branch to branch with extraordinary agility.
There Passepartout beheld beautiful fir and cedar groves, sacred gates of a singular architecture, bridges half hid in the midst of bamboos and reeds, temples shaded by immense cedar-trees, holy retreats where were sheltered Buddhist priests and sectaries of Confucius, and interminable streets, where a perfect harvest of rose-tinted and red-cheeked children, who looked as if they had been cut out of Japanese screens, and who were playing in the midst of short-legged poodles and yellowish cats, might have been gathered.
The Thing itself lay almost entirely buried in sand, amidst the scattered splinters of a fir tree it had shivered to frag- ments in its descent.
Arthur's shadow flitted rather faster among the sturdy oaks of the Chase than might have been expected from the shadow of a tired man on a warm afternoon, and it was still scarcely four o'clock when he stood before the tall narrow gate leading into the delicious labyrinthine wood which skirted one side of the Chase, and which was called Fir-tree Grove, not because the firs were many, but because they were few.
Some are upwards of fifty feet long, cut out of a single tree, either fir or white cedar, and capable of carrying thirty persons.
Both road and stream wound up through a valley dense with scrub oak and fir.