FTC


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FTC

abbr.
Federal Trade Commission

FTC

Federal Trade Commission.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.FTC - an independent agency of the United States federal government that maintains fair and free competitionFTC - an independent agency of the United States federal government that maintains fair and free competition; enforces federal antitrust laws; educates the public about identity theft
independent agency - an agency of the United States government that is created by an act of Congress and is independent of the executive departments
Office of Inspector General, OIG - the investigative arm of the Federal Trade Commission
References in periodicals archive ?
In its ruling, the 9th Circuit held that AT&T cannot exempt its entire business from FTC oversight merely because a portion of its business is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission, a sister agency.
In March 2013, ADHA met with the Office of Policy Planning at the FTC to discuss anti-competitive oral health issues.
The FTC and Amazon then decided to settle, which allowed the refund process to begin.
Second, for lawyers who advise FCC-regulated parties, it would be worth reviewing the FTC comments closely because it is possible, if not likely, that many of the FTC's proposed modifications will be adopted in whole or in part by the FCC," Vladeck said.
Receiving inquiries from the FTC can naturally cause concern.
The purpose of an FTC is to provide fiduciary services to a limited class of family members or trusts created by or for the benefit of family members.
The FTC monitors compliance with the Federal Trade Commission Act and is authorized to take action when it becomes aware of a non-complying advertisement.
Wyndham is the first company to fight back in court, arguing Congress never granted the FTC cybersecurity oversight and the lawsuit therefore exceeds the FTC's enforcement authority.
The FTC first issued the Green Guides in 1992 in response to an explosion of green marketing and advertising claims.
Whole Foods completed its $565 million acquisition of smaller rival Wild Oats in August after the FTC failed to win a temporary injunction to stop the merger, while the agency's administrative examination of the deal unfolded.
The FTC found that this was a way for physicians to communicate to their competitors what prices the physicians would like to get in the future, not what prices physicians had received in the past, or indeed, what physicians might settle for individually in a contract.