Fabian Society

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Fabian Society

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an association of British socialists advocating the establishment of democratic socialism by gradual reforms within the law: founded in 1884

Fa′bian Soci`ety


n.
an organization founded in England in 1884 to spread socialist principles gradually by peaceful means.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fabian Society - an association of British socialists who advocate gradual reforms within the law leading to democratic socialism
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
Fabian - a member of the Fabian Society in Britain
First Baron Passfield, Sidney James Webb, Sidney Webb, Webb - English sociologist and economist and a central member of the Fabian Society (1859-1947)
References in periodicals archive ?
In a similar vein, the press in India is starting to wonder if the economic miracle is returning to the more anemic 'Hindu rate of growth' which Das (2006:2) explains, "had nothing to do with Hinduism and everything to do with the Fabian socialist policies of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru".
On occasion Goodison strays into a flat didacticism: "Norman Manley, Fabian socialist // who'd appealed to the conscience of the United / Fruit Company to donate a fraction of one percent / of a year's profits to the welfare of our peasants.
A minority of Commissioners, led by Fabian socialist Beatrice Webb and Lansbury, rejected the traditional Poor Law philosophy that a person's destitution stemmed from their own moral character failing and that deterrence and punishment should be central features of poor relief.
8) In the Fabian socialist future the needs of the social organism would determine an increasing differentiation of labour.
He was a dedicated Fabian Socialist and friend to the downtrodden, as made plain in his brilliant ethnography, co-authored with Peter Willmott, Family and Kinship in East London (1957), who began a School for Social Entrepreneurs.
George Bernard Shaw, the great Fabian socialist, made a unconsummated marriage, greatly influenced by the carrot of his wife's pounds 4,000 private income a year.
102] Fabian socialist women and women trade unionists vehemently critiqued the notion that only men needed a breadwinner wage and social insurance, pointing out that many women were breadwinners supporting families as well.
As a Fabian socialist, he was content with provisional gains toward a revolutionary end.
When the Fabian socialist authors Beatrice and Sidney Webb coined the term "industrial democracy" in 1897, they almost certainly had no idea that the concepts of work force democracy would still be controversial nearly a century later.
He had married Kitty Dobbs in 1927, the niece of Beatrice and Sydney Webb of Fabian Socialist fame.
He also provides a very useful discussion of the Fabian Socialist influences on the work, considering Sime's socialism as one cause of the cycle's critical neglect.