Fabianism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Fa·bi·an

 (fā′bē-ən)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the caution and avoidance of direct confrontation typical of the Roman general Quintus Fabius Maximus.
b. Cautious or dilatory, as in taking action.
2. Of, relating to, or being a member of the Fabian Society, which was committed to gradual rather than revolutionary means for spreading socialist principles.

[Latin Fabiānus, after Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus.]

Fa′bi·an n.
Fa′bi·an·ism n.
Fa′bi·an·ist n.

Fabianism

(ˈfeɪbɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the beliefs, principles, or practices of the Fabian Society
ˈFabianist n, adj

Fabianism

a late 19th-century English movement that favored the gradual development of socialism by peaceful means. — Fabian, n., adj.
See also: Economics

Fabianism

The political belief that socialism can be introduced by gradual reform rather than by revolution.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fabianism - socialism to be established by gradual reforms within the law
socialism - a political theory advocating state ownership of industry
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
References in periodicals archive ?
Attlee's practical involvement with building the Labour Party into a force in the land was, then, just as important as his intellectual formation by Fabianism and romanticism.
Du Bois and American Political Thought: Fabianism and the
His studies were completed at Cambridge where his PhD on Fabianism and the Fabians 1884--1914 was supervised by M.
Equally reassuring is the acknowledged relevance of Fabianism to British left-wing politics.
45) As remarked by Britain, Charrington was among a group of Fabians "who sought a judicious blending of high and popular culture as the basis for a 'communal' policy in the future" (Britain, Fabianism 242).
The division of the working class into the rough and the respectable, the deserving and undeserving poor, was, after all, central to mainstream social welfare for much of the twentieth century and has informed political philosophies from Fabianism to neo-liberalism.
After traipsing through Paris and listening to reactionary luminaries like Henri Bergson, he arrived as Fabianism became the rage among undergraduates.
8) Ian Britain, Fabianism and Culture: A Study in British Socialism and the Arts, 1884-1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), pp.
In this collection of 13 essays scholars peek behind the fantasy and find plenty, including such topics as the ideologies of gender in the Psammead Trilogy, Fabianism and didacticism, the writing of empire, magical realism in the form of generic manipulation and mutation, comic spirituality and communicating humor, staging desire in Five Children and It, Nesbit's and Dickens's literary borrowings, parallels with the nineteenth-century moral tale, socialist utopia in The Story of the Amulet, H.
And in this way, the ECD's imagining of itself as a gentry 'folk' may be another commentary on the crisis of modern liberalism, one that is not so removed from the Fabianism of the early folklorists like Cecil Sharp (or his Progressive followers in the U.