Fabian

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Fa·bi·an

 (fā′bē-ən)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the caution and avoidance of direct confrontation typical of the Roman general Quintus Fabius Maximus.
b. Cautious or dilatory, as in taking action.
2. Of, relating to, or being a member of the Fabian Society, which was committed to gradual rather than revolutionary means for spreading socialist principles.

[Latin Fabiānus, after Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus.]

Fa′bi·an n.
Fa′bi·an·ism n.
Fa′bi·an·ist n.

Fabian

(ˈfeɪbɪən)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, relating to, or resembling the delaying tactics of the Roman general Quintus Fabius Maximus; cautious; circumspect
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of or sympathizer with the Fabian Society
[C19: from Latin Fabiānus of Fabius]

Fa•bi•an

(ˈfeɪ bi ən)

adj.
1. seeking victory by delay and harassment rather than by a decisive battle, as in the manner of Fabius Maximus defeating Hannibal in the Second Punic War.
2. of or pertaining to the Fabian Society.
n.
3. a member of or sympathizer with the Fabian Society.
[1590–1600; < Latin Fabiānus]
Fa′bi•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fabian - a member of the Fabian Society in Britain
Fabian Society - an association of British socialists who advocate gradual reforms within the law leading to democratic socialism
socialist - a political advocate of socialism
Adj.1.Fabian - of or relating to Fabianism; "the Fabian society"
2.fabian - using cautious slow strategy to wear down opposition; avoiding direct confrontation; "a fabian policy"
cautious - showing careful forethought; "reserved and cautious; never making swift decisions"; "a cautious driver"
Translations
Fabian
Fabien
Fabian

Fabian

[ˈfeɪbɪən]
A. ADJfabianista
B. Nfabianista mf
C. CPD Fabian Society NSociedad f Fabiana
References in periodicals archive ?
It is government itself, and in particular, the interventionist, Fabianist policies of re-distribution, that is at fault for Britain's moral and social decay.
Yet without McKay's early Fabianist Jamaican "dialect" poetry united with his later Marxist incendiary sonnets, it is difficult to imagine the development of the Caribbean language verse of uprising, from the Ja "patwa" dub poetry of Linton Kwesi Johnson to the stirring lyricism of the Bajan Brathwaite himself.
The 'excess of meaning washes off,' shows good understanding of the Cultural Studies heritage from Nietzsche, Bataille and Barthes - hardly 'literary disciplines,' nor 'symbols' nor 'deciphering,' but anyway, the point has been conceded, perhaps dangerously for anthropology: Cultural Studies has the contract on the contemporary and on complexity; a thousand anthropological voices would rise in protest because he has othered his discipline in a Fabianist temporality: it will be a fairly passive traditional information retainer while others can have fun making meaning in the here and now, being pro-active and culturally productive.