fair trade

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fair trade

n.
1. Trade carried on according to a commercial agreement under which distributors sell products of a given class at no less than a minimum price set by the manufacturer.
2. Trade that is considered fair because it respects workers' rights and minimizes environmental damage.

fair′-trade′ adj.

fair trade

n
1.
a. the practice of directly benefiting producers in the developing world by buying straight from them at a guaranteed price
b. (as modifier): fair-trade coffee.
2. (Commerce)
a. the practice of directly benefiting producers in the developing world by buying straight from them at a guaranteed price
b. (as modifier): fair-trade coffee.

fair′ trade′


n.
trade carried on under a fair-trade agreement.

fair′-trade′



v. -trad•ed, -trad•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to sell (a commodity) under a fair-trade agreement.
adj.
2. subject to or resulting from a fair-trade agreement.
[1940–45]
fair′-trad′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fair trade - trade that satisfies certain criteria on the supply chain of the goods involved, usually including fair payment for producers; often with other social and environmental considerations
trade - the commercial exchange (buying and selling on domestic or international markets) of goods and services; "Venice was an important center of trade with the East"; "they are accused of conspiring to constrain trade"
2.fair trade - trade that is conducted legally
trade - the commercial exchange (buying and selling on domestic or international markets) of goods and services; "Venice was an important center of trade with the East"; "they are accused of conspiring to constrain trade"
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps an excerpt from the Columbia Encyclopedia, sixth edition, on the subject of fair-trade laws will help illuminate agent concerns over federal regulation:
When the grassroots electorate becomes engaged in this fight, we'll change bad free-trade laws into good fair-trade laws that will reflect the interests of small manufacturers who've been absent from trade policy deliberations far too long.
In 1975 Congress repealed two laws that allowed individual states to enact their own fair-trade laws allowing minimum resale price maintenance.