fairy tale

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fairy tale

n.
1. A fanciful tale of legendary deeds and creatures, usually intended for children.
2. A fictitious, highly fanciful story or explanation.

fairy tale

or

fairy story

n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a story about fairies or other mythical or magical beings, esp one of traditional origin told to children
2. a highly improbable account

fair′y tale`


n.
1. a story, usu. for children, about elves, hobgoblins, dragons, fairies, or other magical creatures.
2. an incredible or misleading statement or account. Also called fair′y sto`ry.
[1740–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fairy tale - a story about fairiesfairy tale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
narration, narrative, story, tale - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
Bluebeard - (fairytale) a monstrous villain who marries seven women; he kills the first six for disobedience
2.fairy tale - an interesting but highly implausible story; often told as an excuse
fib, taradiddle, tarradiddle, tale, story - a trivial lie; "he told a fib about eating his spinach"; "how can I stop my child from telling stories?"

fairy tale

fairy story
noun
1. folk tale, romance, traditional story She was like a princess in a fairy tale.
2. lie, fantasy, fiction, invention, fabrication, untruth, porky (Brit. slang), pork pie (Brit. slang), urban myth, tall story, urban legend, cock-and-bull story (informal) many of those who write books lie much more than those who tell fairy tales
Translations
pohádka
eventyr
satu
bajka
tündérmese
ævintýri
おとぎ話
동화
pravljica
saga
นิทานเทพนิยาย
chuyện cổ tích

fairy tale

nfiaba; (lie) → frottola

fairy tale

حِكَايَةٌ خُرافِيَّة pohádka eventyr Märchen παραμύθι cuento de hadas satu conte de fées bajka fiaba おとぎ話 동화 sprookje eventyr bajka conto de fadas сказка saga นิทานเทพนิยาย peri masalı chuyện cổ tích 童话
References in classic literature ?
Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal.
Once on a time I really imagined myself "an author of fairy tales," but now I am merely an editor or private secretary for a host of youngsters whose ideas I am requestsed to weave into the thread of my stories.
CECILY:--"Besides, fairy tales always end nicely and this doesn't.
We were talking fairy tales," he answered, "and they are not nonsense.
I've come to bring you some money, too, for nightingales, we know, can't live on fairy tales," he said.
Was it not like the old fairy tales, the you-help-us and we'll-help-you of Psyche and the ants?
They will say that it is but one more of the fairy tales of this wonderful Mr.
Reed's lace frills, and crimped her nightcap borders, fed our eager attention with passages of love and adventure taken from old fairy tales and other ballads; or (as at a later period I discovered) from the pages of Pamela, and Henry, Earl of Moreland.
Some of the cottonwoods had already turned, and the yellow leaves and shining white bark made them look like the gold and silver trees in fairy tales.
As Rose stood by him watching the ease with which he quickly brought order out of chaos, she privately resolved to hunt up her old arithmetic and perfect herself in the four first rules, with a good tug at fractions, before she read any more fairy tales.
One never tires of poking about in the dense woods that clothe all these lofty Neckar hills to their beguiling and impressive charm in any country; but German legends and fairy tales have given these an added charm.
Or, to choose a wholly unsubstantial instance, purely addressed to the fancy, why, in reading the old fairy tales of Central Europe, does the tall pale man of the Hartz forests, whose changeless pallor unrestingly glides through the green of the groves --why is this phantom more terrible than all the whooping imps of the Blocksburg?