parochial school

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parochial school

n.
A primary or secondary school supported by a religious organization.

paro′chial school`


n.
a primary or secondary school maintained by a religious organization.
[1745–55]

parochial school

- A school established and maintained by a religious body, from Latin parochialis, "of a parish."
See also related terms for maintained.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parochial school - a private religious school run by a church or parishparochial school - a private religious school run by a church or parish
religious school - a school run by a religious body
Catholic school - a parochial school maintained by the Catholic Church
References in periodicals archive ?
Hunt and Carper's latest contribution to the literature on religion and education can contribute a depth of knowledge and understanding regarding issues surrounding faith-based schools.
This time, though, it's education and Mr Robinson's comparison of elements of our faith-based schools to apartheid.
Economists and other researchers, most from the World Bank, Chile, and Harvard University, present recent empirical evidence on the effectiveness of various public-private education partnerships on the three continents, including voucher programs and faith-based schools.
Toronto--Discussion has continued to swirl over Ontario Progressive Conservative party leader John Tory's pledge to fund faith-based schools if his party wins the Oct.
Speaking at the National Association of Head Teachers' annual conference in Bournemouth, Mr Knight said: "I'm quite keen on faith-based schools twinning with those of other faiths or a network of schools within a community being able to go and talk to other schools about their faith to extend that understanding.
000 Ontario students who attend faith-based schools (which include Protestant, Muslim and Jewish) do so in schools that are not publicly funded.
The report from a number of Islamic groups called for more Government funding for Islamic schools, despite advice from a Commons committee that faith-based schools fuel division among conflict.
This is an apparent reference to his and Bush's support for vouchers for faith-based schools.
Faith-based schools, they assume, are in the business of "indoctrinating" their pupils, while public schools are by definition committed to critical thinking and t o the emancipation of their pupils' minds from the darkness of received opinions, even those of their own parents.
But no, we can't do that because the Government is committed to encouraging faith-based schools, again insisting they are the way ahead when common sense suggests the opposite.
A TOP union boss has branded Government plans to increase the number of faith-based schools a 'time-bomb'.
Faith-based schools have also joined the charter schools in meeting the educational needs of students in New Orleans.