Munchausen syndrome

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Mun·chau·sen syndrome

 (mŭn′chou′zən, mŭnch′hou′-)
n.
A psychiatric disorder characterized by the repeated fabrication of disease signs and symptoms for the purpose of gaining medical attention.

[After Baron Karl Friedrich Hieronymus von Münchhausen (because the fabricated diseases recalled his fictionalized accounts of his life).]

Mun′chausen syn`drome


n.
a factitious disorder in which otherwise healthy individuals seek to hospitalize themselves with feigned or self-induced pathology in order to receive medical treatment.
[1950–55; named after Baron von Münchhausen, whose fictionalized accounts of his own experiences suggest symptoms of the disorder]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Munchausen syndrome - syndrome consisting of feigning acute and dramatic illness for which no clinical evidence is ever found
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
References in periodicals archive ?
The same research also found that those employees who choose to fake illness cost the UK an astronomical PS900 million per year.
Which gives blokes carte blanche to fake illness to get out of jobs around the house or Christmas shopping and instead to collapse on the sofa without the strength to do anything much but watch Sky Sports.
In a desperate attempt to avoid Murphy, Mr Armstrong-Smith would often fake illness so that he was allowed to stay at home.
TRAVEL giants have blacklisted hundreds of British holidaymakers who fake illness to get compensation.
During the last two year, Pervez Musharraf had interviewed for more than 40 private TV channels but he was summoned by the court, he admits in the hospital in fake illness, the petition added.
According to a report published in this newspaper, a whole floor has been reserved for those who despite plundering the national wealth can enjoy the luxuries of comfortable rooms of the same health facility by producing fake illness certificates.
Workers called Andy and Sarah are most likely to fake illness to get a day off work, while others likely to fake sickness include Steve, Paul, John and Dave.
But those who fake illness so they don't have to fast will have to fast at a later time, and they commit a sin.
But we will crack down on fraudsters who fake illness.
Looking back, it's a wonder that boarding school pupils who did not want to return to school for a new term did not fake illness in order to stay at home for a extra few days.
This week, I particularly enjoyed the exposure of Amy and Ste's lie about baby Leah's fake illness.