Falkland Islands Dependencies


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Falkland Islands Dependencies

pl n
(Placename) the former name (until 1985) for South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it was not until late 1944 that the first of these "wonderful" animals were dispatched to Antarctica, particularly to Graham Land, the northern part of the Antarctic Peninsula and then part of the Falkland Islands Dependencies (South Georgia, South Orkney Islands, South Sandwich Islands, South Shetland Islands, Graham Land).
Bingham then volunteered as the medical officer for the British Graham Land Expedition of 1934-37, and in February 1945 he was to be appointed the first field leader of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), which arose from Operation Tabarin in July 1945.
The end of hostilities in Europe in May 1945 led to Operation Tabarin being replaced by Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in July.
Geoffrey left for Antarctica in October 1947 as part of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey.
He continued to write on the glaciology of northern Ellesmere and completed three books on place-names in the Falkland Islands Dependencies, the British Antarctic Territory, and what is now Quttinirpaaq National Park in Nunavut.
On board the Shackleton, a 1,100-ton research vessel operated by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, are two South Wales men.
Codenamed Operation Tabarin, the expedition was sent to discourage the use of Antarctic anchorages by enemy raiders and to strengthen British sovereignty of the Falkland Islands dependencies.
At the end of the war, the stations were transferred to a new civilian organisation, the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS).
Mr Walton, now aged 85, of Colwall, near Malvern, Worcestershire, worked for the fledgling British Antarctic Survey, which was then known as the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, between 1945 and 1948.
The ship was sent to Deception Island, where it picked up Vivian Fuchs and other men who had been stranded for an extra winter at the base of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (later the British Antarctic Survey) on Stonington Island.
Following three years in the Arctic, Angus was persuaded in a pub to join the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey and go to the Antarctic.
He received the Polar Medal for his work on the British North Greenland Expedition and a clasp for his work on the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey.

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