famine

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fam·ine

 (făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. A drastic shortage; a dearth.
3. Severe hunger; starvation.
4. Archaic Extreme appetite.

[Middle English, from Old French, from faim, hunger, from Latin famēs.]

famine

(ˈfæmɪn)
n
1. a severe shortage of food, as through crop failure or overpopulation
2. acute shortage of anything
3. violent hunger
[C14: from Old French, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēs hunger]

fam•ine

(ˈfæm ɪn)

n.
1. extreme and general scarcity of food, esp. within a large geographical area.
2. any extreme scarcity.
3. Archaic. starvation.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, derivative of faim hunger (< Latin famēs)]

famine

, famish - Famine and famish come from Latin fames, "hunger."
See also related terms for hunger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.famine - an acute insufficiencyfamine - an acute insufficiency    
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
the Great Calamity, the Great Hunger, the Great Starvation, the Irish Famine - a famine in Ireland resulting from a potato blight; between 1846 and 1851 a million people starved to death and 1.6 million emigrated (most to America)

famine

noun hunger, want, starvation, deprivation, scarcity, dearth, destitution refugees trapped by war, drought and famine
Quotations
"They that die by famine die by inches" [Matthew Henry Expositions on the Old and New Testament]
Translations
مَجاعَةنَقْص، مَجاعَه، جوع
hladomor
hungersnødsult
nälänhätä
glad
éhínség
hallæri
飢饉
기근
badas
bads
hladomor
lakota
hungersnöd
ความขาดแคลนอาหาร
nạn đói

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
A. N (= hunger) → hambruna f; (= shortage) → escasez f
B. CPD famine relief Nayuda f contra el hambre

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
nfamine f
modif
famine relief → aide f aux victimes de la famine
famine victim → victime f de la famine

famine

n (lit)Hungersnot f; (fig)Knappheit f; to die of famineverhungern

famine

[ˈfæmɪn] ncarestia

famine

(ˈfӕmin) noun
(a) great lack or shortage especially of food. Some parts of the world suffer regularly from famine.

famine

مَجاعَة hladomor hungersnød Hungersnot λιμός hambruna nälänhätä famine glad carestia 飢饉 기근 hongersnood hungersnød głód fome, penúria голод hungersnöd ความขาดแคลนอาหาร kıtlık nạn đói 饥荒

famine

n. hambre, carestía.
References in classic literature ?
The blaze of the spring season had burst upon Seawood, littering its foreshore with famines and bathing-machines, with nomadic preachers and nigger minstrels, before the two friends saw it again, and long before the storm of pursuit after the strange secret society had died away.
We are told by historians that widespread famines occurred in those days every two or three years, and such was the condition of things that men actually had recourse to cannibalism, in secret, of course.
If there exist savages so barbarous as never to think of the inherited character of the offspring of their domestic animals, yet any one animal particularly useful to them, for any special purpose, would be carefully preserved during famines and other accidents, to which savages are so liable, and such choice animals would thus generally leave more offspring than the inferior ones; so that in this case there would be a kind of unconscious selection going on.
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
He knew it existed, as we know that crime and abominations exist; he had heard of it as a peaceable citizen in a town hears of battles, famines, and floods, and yet knows nothing of what these things mean -- though, indeed, he may have been mixed up in a street row, have gone without his dinner once, or been soaked to the skin in a shower.
He must have been born in some time of general drought and famine, or upon one of those fast days for which his state is famous.
Captain Marsh and Famine and Pestilence the baby COYOTES, and Sour-Mash and her pups, and Sardanapalus and her kittens - hang these names she gives the creatures, they warp my jaw - and Potter: you - all sitting around in the house, and Soldier Boy at the window the entire time, it's a wonder to me she comes along as well as she does.
Not only that; but the village, light-headed with famine, fire, and bell-ringing, and bethinking itself that Monsieur Gabelle had to do with the collection of rent and taxes--though it was but a small instalment of taxes, and no rent at all, that Gabelle had got in those latter days--became impatient for an interview with him, and, surrounding his house, summoned him to come forth for personal conference.
It is a very justifiable cause of a war, to invade a country after the people have been wasted by famine, destroyed by pestilence, or embroiled by factions among themselves.
He confessed with the utmost frankness and ingenuity that the priests and religious have given dreadful accounts both of us and of the religion we preached; that the unhappy people were taught by them that the curse of God attended us wheresoever we went; that we were always followed by the grasshoppers, that pest of Abyssinia, which carried famine and destruction over all the country; that he, seeing no grasshoppers following us when we passed by their village, began to doubt of the reality of what the priests had so confidently asserted, and was now convinced that the representation they made of us was calumny and imposture.
Bartholomew in 1572; and then, above all this, this extreme measure, which was not at all repugnant to the king, good Catholic as he was, always fell before this argument of the besieging generals--La Rochelle is impregnable except to famine.
It was at the extreme western limit of the buffalo range, and these animals had recently been completely hunted out of the neighborhood by the Nez Perces, so that, although the hunters of the garrison were continually on the alert, ranging the country round, they brought in scarce game sufficient to keep famine from the door.