Fante

(redirected from Fantes)

Fan·te

or Fan·ti  (făn′tē, fän′-)
n. pl. Fante or Fanti also Fan·tes or Fan·tis
1. A member of a people inhabiting Ghana.
2. The variety of Akan spoken by this people.

Fan•te

(fan′tē, fän′-)

n., pl. -tes (esp. collectively) -te.
1. member of an African people of coastal Ghana
2. the group of Akan dialects spoken by the Fante.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his fiction, the Fantes became the Bandinis, the Toscanas, and the Molises, but their last name always ended in a vowel and thus betrayed the family's immigrant roots.
Interestingly enough, a not-yet-classic author like the Italian-American John Fante has had an impact on popular culture and music both in Italy and in the United States.
American music, Charles Bukowski, ethnic literature, John Fante, Italian-American literature, Italian music, Marracash, Raiz
Interestingly enough, even a not-yet-classic author like the Italian-American John Fante has had an impact on popular culture and music both in Italy and in the United States.
In his seminal book Italian Signs, American Streets, critic Fred Gardaphe (1996: 58) lamented that despite the support of HL Mencken and James Farrell, two leading critics at the time in which Fante was writing, the Italian-American writer had received little critical attention and was left out by most studies of the 1930s.
In fact, for most of his life, Fante eked out a living thanks to his work as a screenwriter for Hollywood until, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, his name finally reappeared in literary circles nationwide and abroad.
Fantes, MD, associate medical director for Providence Community Health Centers, which is partnering with The Providence Center on projects on each organization's home turf.
Providence Community Health Centers' Fantes explains that the program maintains some open access to the social worker's time for clinic patients, and pre-scheduled appointments are made for some patients as well.
If she starts to do a whole bunch of counseling, that limits the time available for referrals," says Fantes.
Thus slaves acquired property rights, as control of property among Fantes was subject to claims by members of the "lineage.
He uses commission transcripts to evaluate the nature of African American property ownership during and after slavery, comparing conditions in the South to those among the Fante people of Britain's Gold Coast colony.
Penningroth traces the "networks of dependents" that contributed to family building in Fante and America (81).