Last Supper

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Last Supper

n.
1. In the Bible, Jesus's supper on the night before his crucifixion. His sharing of bread and wine with the Apostles at that meal is seen by many Christian churches as instituting the sacrament of the Eucharist. Also called Lord's Supper.
2. An artistic representation of this event.

Last Supper

n
(Bible) the Last Supper the meal eaten by Christ with his disciples on the night before his Crucifixion, during which he is believed to have instituted the Eucharist

Last′ Sup′per


n.
the supper of Jesus and His disciples on the eve of His Crucifixion. Compare Lord's Supper (def. 1).

Last Supper

The traditional Passover meal which Jesus shared with his Apostles the night before his death. Jesus is said to have blessed bread and told the Apostles to “Take eat, this is my body.” and passed wine saying, “This is my blood.” These elements are part of the communion service.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Last Supper - the traditional Passover supper of Jesus with his disciples on the eve of his crucifixionLast Supper - the traditional Passover supper of Jesus with his disciples on the eve of his crucifixion
Passover supper, Seder - (Judaism) the ceremonial dinner on the first night (or both nights) of Passover
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Holy Spirit descended on Jesus as a dove during his baptism, and in his Farewell Discourse after the Last Supper Jesus promised to send the Holy Spirit to his disciples after his departure.
Even in his farewell discourse to his disciples he said, "My peace I give to you, the peace that the world can't give".
Elated to be rid of him so easily, the people came in great numbers to hear his farewell discourse.
draws attention to the way Mark uses setting to lend solemnity and importance to the farewell discourse in Mark 13 (43), and continues by musing poignantly on Mark's depiction of Jesus' loneliness and solitude (44).
They are from the beginning of a farewell discourse, and we presume that a person's last words are regarded as sacred and significant.
Amid this, his farewell discourse to his disciples, he explains to them how "it is to your advantage that go away" in order that "when the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth" (John 16:7, 13).