Faust

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Related to Faust legend: Mephistopheles, Faustian Tale

Faust

 (foust) also Faus·tus (fou′stəs, fô′-)
n.
A magician and alchemist in German legend who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for power and knowledge.

[German, after Johann Faust (1480?-1540?), German magician and alchemist.]

Faust′i·an (fou′stē-ən) adj.

Faust

(faʊst) or

Faustus

n
(European Myth & Legend) German legend a magician and alchemist who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power

Faust

(faʊst)

also Faus•tus

(ˈfaʊ stəs, ˈfɔ-)

n.
a magician in medieval German legend who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Faust - an alchemist of German legend who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for knowledgeFaust - an alchemist of German legend who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for knowledge
Translations

Faust

[faʊst] NFausto
References in periodicals archive ?
The commentator also announces some major themes in the Foreword: the double nature, objective and subjective, of time (especially ironic in the land of watches and clocks), the placement of the story before the cataclysmic Great War, the use of the Faust legend, the unusual length of the novel, the playful recurrence of the number seven and the magic spell that dominates the mountain (Mann, The Magic Mountain, trans.
It was named Halicephalobus mephisto after mestopheles, the demon in the Faust legend.
Comedy based on the Faust legend, starring Dudley Moore and Peter Cook.
Set in the mid-1950s, "Damn Yankees" is a modern retelling of the Faust legend with a baseball theme.
Marguerite does not appear anywhere in the folk sources of the Faust legend.
It is a clever parody of the Faust legend starring Dudley Moore as Stanley Moon, a man desperate to win the girl of his dreams, who sells his soul to the Devil, aka George Spiggot (Peter Cook).
He knew both the dangers of temptation and its delights, never more clearly expressed than in his adaptation of the Faust legend which was filmed at least 15 times during the silent era.
This new play from celebrated writer David Napthine ( a reworking of the Faust legend ( is billed as a "hilarious and thought-provoking satire on the selling of New Labour's soul".
The perennial Faust legend has inspired more masterpieces than we can number here, but the setting by Berlioz sits uneasily in the illustrious company of such as Marlowe, Goethe, Mahler and Thomas Mann.