goddess

(redirected from Female deities)
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Related to Female deities: goddess

god·dess

 (gŏd′ĭs)
n.
1. A female being of supernatural powers or attributes, believed in and worshiped by a people.
2. often Goddess A female being believed to be the source of life and being and worshiped as the principal deity in various religions. Used with the.
3. An image of a female supernatural being; an idol.
4. Something, such as fame or wealth, that is worshiped or idealized.
5. A woman of great beauty or grace.

goddess

(ˈɡɒdɪs)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a female divinity
2. a woman who is adored or idealized, esp by a man
ˈgoddessˌhood, ˈgoddess-ˌship n

god•dess

(ˈgɒd ɪs)

n.
1. a female god or deity.
2. a greatly admired or adored woman.
3. a woman of great beauty.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.goddess - a female deitygoddess - a female deity      
deity, divinity, god, immortal - any supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force
earth goddess, earth-goddess - a goddess of fertility and vegetation
Translations
jumalatar
Istennő
女神
Dea
Dumnezeiţă
bohyňa
boginja
gudinna

goddess

[ˈgɒdɪs] Ndiosa f

goddess

[ˈgɒdɛs] n
(= female god) → déesse f
the moon goddess → la déesse de la lune sex goddess

goddess

nGöttin f

goddess

[ˈgɒdɪs] ndea
References in periodicals archive ?
Ajrud inscriptions and the Khirbet el-Qom blessing as indications that some Israelites worshiped female deities like Asherah.
The introduction alone is full of insightful elucidations, such as the analysis of the "de-mitologizzazione" process in the De mulieribus, by which many female deities are humanized through Boccaccio's historical re-telling of their lives.
Readers who are interested in Women and Religion can find from this book how Wu Zhao glorified women's creativity, reproductive power, motherhood, leadership, and sovereignty through worshiping her female deities.
Scholars working in religion, psychology, and other fields in the US, Australia, and Brazil consider whether faith in the Bible is compatible with feminism; feminist egalitarianism in prehistory and early history; feminist perspectives from the Hebrew Bible; women's history in religious literature and women's ordination; the possibility that Tamar, daughter of David, wrote narratives in the Bible; women in the Quran; female deities in Hinduism; womanliness in John; feminism in the Eastern Orthodox Church; and the mystical feminine in Baha'i scriptures.
In a speech, Uchtdorf, second counselor in the church's governing first presidency, referred twice to women as "daughters of heavenly parents," alluding to the Mormon belief in male and female deities.
The chants became more complex when two female vocalists joined in on the suite's second movement, dedicated to the female deities in Santeria, also known as Regla de Ocha.
Female deities are featured prominently in Shakespeare's romances and Milton's masque where they are juxtaposed with a figure crucial to these narratives, the patriarchal daughter: In Comus, the nymph Sabrina frees the daughter held captive by Comus; in Pericles the goddess Diana appears immediately following the reunion of father and daughter; in The Tempest, divine and semi-divine goddesses are invoked by Prospero to bless and celebrate the betrothal of his daughter.
Our room at Angel House, the Goddess Room, had beautiful artwork: sculptures and paintings of female deities.
The discussion on Buddhist images by Johne falls into the following sections: the historical Buddha and the transcendent Buddhas, the Bodhisatvas Avalokiteshvara and Manjushri, the male divinities Heruka, Vajrasattva, Bhaishajyaguru and Jambhala, and the female deities Tara, Pancharakshas, Chunda, Parnashavari and Marichi.
They were the sons and daughter of the enlightening ones: the sun (loro) being the male deity, the moon and the stars (fulan no fitun) being female deities.
Since many of the essays of the book contain interesting conjectures, one can add another: Could the "maleness" of the deity of the Hebrew Bible be a reaction to the female deities around it in its formative period?
He considers rites and legends that were related to practices of animal sacrifice, weaving, silk production, spirit pacification, and medicine and that claimed female deities and weaving maidens as founding ancestors, highlighting the role of gender issues in the formation of economic and cultic systems of the period.