Fermat's last theorem


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Fer·mat's last theorem

 (fĕr-mäz′)
n.
The theorem that the equation an + bn = cn has no solutions in positive integers a, b, c if n is an integer greater than 2. It was stated as a marginal note by Pierre de Fermat around 1630 and not proved until 1994 by the British mathematician Andrew Wiles (born 1953).

Fermat's last theorem

(fɜːˈmæts)
n
(Mathematics) (in number theory) the hypothesis that the equation xn + yn = zn has no integral solutions for n greater than two

Fer·mat's last theorem

(fĕr-mäz′)
A theorem stating that the equation an + bn = cn has no solution if a, b, and c are positive integers and if n is an integer greater than 2. The theorem was first stated by the French mathematician Pierre de Fermat around 1630, but not proved until 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
So has Fermat's last theorem been proved, or has it not?
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French mathematician, and deviser of Fermat's Last Theorem.
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