birth rate

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birth·rate

also birth rate  (bûrth′rāt′)
n.
The ratio of total live births to total population in a specified community or area over a specified period of time. The birthrate is often expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 of the population per year. Also called natality.

birth rate

n
(Sociology) the ratio of live births in a specified area, group, etc, to the population of that area, etc, usually expressed per 1000 population per year
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.birth rate - the ratio of live births in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000 population per year
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
Translations

birth rate

n(indice m or tasso di) natalità
References in periodicals archive ?
Men undergoing bariatric surgery may be at increased risk of sperm aberrations and lower fertility rates despite improvements in weight, androgen levels and sexual quality of life.
Addressing the launching ceremony of medical journal - 2016, containing 12 articles related to fertility rates in South Asia, he said research done and data collected from across the country reveals that fertility rate, during past 14 years, has not decreased even by 1%.
Following World War II, fertility rates were the highest averaging 122.
Objective: The EUROLIFE project will develop and test an advanced microscopic method for establishing human fertility rates in Europe over the period of the postulated Neolithic Demographic Transition (NDT) c.
We concur with these other scholars who have raised concerns about weakening that link and the potentially profound impact it will have on the United States' declining and already below-replacement level fertility rate, increasing the likelihood of bringing within our borders the socioeconomic problems experienced by countries abroad with sustained, extremely low fertility rates.
On the trend of older mothers, the report said: "In most developed countries, women have been increasingly delaying childbearing to later in life, which has resulted in rising fertility rates among older women.
This, as a policy brief released by the National Economic and Development Authority (Neda) and the United Nations Population Fund showed that because fertility rates in the country dropped at a slower pace than most of its Asian neighbors and resulted in a relatively high population growth rate, the country failed to achieve a 'demographic transition' in the past decade that would have led to faster economic growth.
I expected the rates to be even lower based on my observation and studies on the matter, and that's due to several reasons, including the pressures of the fast-moving modern society on the younger generations," said Reema Sabban, associate professor of Sociology at Zayed University on the reasons for the drop in fertility rates among Emirati women over a five-year period.
The analysed and presented cartographic data on total fertility rates, birth rates, life expectancy, the percentage share of over 65 year olds, the infant mortality rates and adolescent-specific fertility rates from 2011 are the image of an aging European population with higher values of life expectancy, the number of which decreases, based on the natural movement.
Late marriages, putting off having children and high costs of raising children are among the several reasons for a dramatic dip in fertility rates among Emiratis in Dubai, according to findings that are worrying policymakers.
Fertility rates have been declining in East and Southeast Asia, and the trend in China has mirrored that of its neighbors.
Fertility rates have declined during recessions and increased in the later years of expansions.