fertility cult


Also found in: Wikipedia.

fertility cult

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the practice in some settled agricultural communities of performing religious or magical rites to ensure good weather and crops and the perpetuity of the tribe
References in periodicals archive ?
A fertility cult, if practiced correctly, ties the gods' hands behind their backs.
It is a story about the plight of these women who are in the clutches of an ancient fertility cult and are forced to serve the Gods.
Archaeology and the Fertility Cult in the Ancient Mediterranean (Malta: University of Malta Press, 1986) pp.
However, without engaging with and empowering the local practitioners, the state agent created an illusive image of the Festival associated with a primitive fertility cult, sexual promiscuity and sacred remembrance.
Associated with a prehistoric fertility cult, what is the name of the hill figure near Dorchester, Dorset?
Perhaps his discussion will finally lay to rest the hypothesis of a fertility cult that practiced ritual sex, or at least drive another nail into its coffin.
He was convinced that Jesus Christ never existed but was an analogy for the Fly Agaric mushroom, around which the activities of an ancient fertility cult revolved.
Not the imprint of the body itself most of the time, but the imprint of the pictograph, first drawn naively as a kind of folded mandorla that contained nothing but itself, and then multiplied in a fertility cult of the image as prolific as the mass culture of the mechanical reproduction with which it disseminates itself.
It was a species of fertility cult, guided by Druids and celebrating spring and harvest, with appropriate rites to assure abundance of lambs and "corn" (grain).
Behind all names in the Greek novel there is the imagery of one and the same fertility cult that creates common motifs and similar characters; the names of the characters uncover a certain East-Mediterranean cycle of myths.
One of the principal debates in the historiography of European witchcraft was prompted by Margaret Murray's assertion that the witch, rather than being a fabrication, actually belonged to a pre-Christian Dianic fertility cult that had survived in certain remote regions of the continent.
The rites of passage allied to the fertility cult were the mechanism used to affirm the identity of a scattered nation.