fetal hemoglobin

(redirected from Fetal blood)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Fetal blood: fetal hemoglobin

fetal hemoglobin

n.
The predominant form of hemoglobin in fetuses and newborn infants, present in small amounts in adults but often elevated in adults with certain forms of anemia and other disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their location near the cord site may lead to umbilical cord constriction and compromise of fetal blood flow.
During labour, the treating clinicians wrongly took a fetal blood sample from the crown of her head, causing a subdural haematoma in Sophie's brain which resulted in her suffering massive life-limiting injuries.
pregnancy long lasting is attributed to several complications during delivery, such as infection of the uterus, decrease in fetal heart rate, fetal blood acidification and Mental and Physical adverse effects on mother and fetus.
A fetal blood transfusion is needed in rare cases where the baby suffers from severe anaemia whilst still inside the mother's womb, a condition that is critical and can cause a still birth if not treated on time.
This will include life-saving procedures such as fetal blood transfusions, laser treatment, bladder shunts and other procedures which are carried out at Liverpool Women's to save babies' lives in the womb - and sometimes those of their mothers.
Since the fetus gets its oxygen from the mother's blood, this condition leads to decreased oxygen in the fetal blood.
All staff now attend mandatory training sessions on electronic fetal monitoring and the use of fetal blood sampling.
31) The clinical, umbilical cord compromise with focal placental lesions of decreased fetal blood flow, which is frequently a random pregnancy accident, did not correlate with diffuse PU, although they can produce the focal PU, so-called stasis-induced thrombotic vasculopathy, with clusters of avascular, fibrotic, and occasionally hemosiderotic chorionic villi.
During prenatal follow-up, no interventions, including fetal blood sampling or intrauterine transfusion, were performed.
The following diagnostic tools are important (Norwegian Institute of Public Health 2007; Norwegian Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2008): two-dimensional ultrasound, cardiotocography, STwaveform analysis (STAN) and fetal blood analysis.
Previous tests looked for a few fetal blood cells, perhaps 10 out of 200 billion in the sample, and those were fragile.
The instrument must be optimized for small sample volume, ideally 25 [micro]L or less to conserve fetal blood volume.