fiddler

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Related to Fiddlers: FDLRS

fid·dle

 (fĭd′l)
n.
1. A violin, especially one used to play folk or country music.
2. Nautical A guardrail used on a table during rough weather to prevent things from slipping off.
3. Informal Nonsensical, trifling matters: "There are things that are important / beyond all this fiddle" (Marianne Moore).
4. Chiefly British An instance of cheating or swindling; a fraud.
v. fid·dled, fid·dling, fid·dles
v.intr.
1. To play a fiddle.
2. To touch or handle something in a nervous way: fiddled with the collar of his shirt as he spoke.
3. To make unskilled efforts at repairing or improving: fiddled with the broken toaster.
4. To meddle or tamper: a reporter who fiddled with the facts.
5. Chiefly British To commit a fraud, especially to steal from one's employer.
v.tr.
1. To play (a tune) on a fiddle.
2. Chiefly British To alter or falsify for dishonest gain: fiddled the figures in the report.
Phrasal Verbs:
fiddle around
To act foolishly, playfully, or without a clear sense of purpose: Quit fiddling around and get to work!
fiddle away
To waste or squander: fiddled away the morning browsing the internet.

[Middle English fidle, from Old English fithele.]

fid′dler n.

fiddler

(ˈfɪdlə)
n
1. (Music, other) a person who plays the fiddle, esp in folk music
2. (Animals) See fiddler crab
3. a person who wastes time or acts aimlessly
4. informal a cheat or petty rogue
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiddler - a musician who plays the violinfiddler - a musician who plays the violin  
instrumentalist, musician, player - someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)
2.fiddler - someone who manipulates in a nervous or unconscious manner
manipulator - a person who handles things manually
3.fiddler - an unskilled person who tries to fix or mend
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
Translations
عازِف الكَمان
houslistapodfukář
fidusmagerspillemandsvindlerviolinspiller
hegedûs
fiîlari; fitlari; svindlari
muzikant

fiddler

[ˈfɪdləʳ] N
1. (Mus) → violinista mf
2. (esp Brit) (= cheat) → tramposo/a m/f

fiddler

n
(Mus inf) → Geiger(in) m(f)
(inf: = cheat) → Schwindler(in) m(f), → Betrüger(in) m(f)

fiddler

[ˈfɪdləʳ] n
a. (Mus) → violinista m/f
b. (fam) (cheat) → imbroglione/a

fiddle

(ˈfidl) noun
1. a violin. She played the fiddle.
2. a dishonest business arrangement. He's working a fiddle over his taxes.
verb
1. to play a violin. He fiddled while they danced.
2. (with with) to make restless, aimless movements. Stop fiddling with your pencil!
3. to manage (money, accounts etc) dishonestly. She has been fiddling the accounts for years.
ˈfiddler noun
fiddler crab
a small crab, the male of which has an enlarged claw.
on the fiddle
dishonest. He's always on the fiddle.
References in classic literature ?
For, instead of a long train with royal diadems, I saw in one family two fiddlers, three spruce courtiers, and an Italian prelate.
In a room above one of the stores, where a dance was to be held, the fiddlers tuned their instruments.
The mimic royalty on the stage, with their soaked satins clinging to their bodies, slopped about ankle-deep in water, warbling their sweetest and best, the fiddlers under the eaves of the state sawed away for dear life, with the cold overflow spouting down the backs of their necks, and the dry and happy King sat in his lofty box and wore his gloves to ribbons applauding.
Five little fiddlers played as loudly as possible, and the people were laughing and singing, while a big table near by was loaded with delicious fruits and nuts, pies and cakes, and many other good things to eat.
When the first music was played, he said, "It was a wonder how so many fiddlers could play at one time, without putting one another out.
Dear, dear, what a place it looked, that Astley's; with all the paint, gilding, and looking-glass; the vague smell of horses suggestive of coming wonders; the curtain that hid such gorgeous mysteries; the clean white sawdust down in the circus; the company coming in and taking their places; the fiddlers looking carelessly up at them while they tuned their instruments, as if they didn't want the play to begin, and knew it all beforehand
The movement grew more passionate: the fiddlers behind the luminous pillar of cloud now and then varied the air by playing on the wrong side of the bridge or with the back of the bow.
At the upper end of the room, seated in a shady bower of holly and evergreens were the two best fiddlers, and the only harp, in all Muggleton.
Two days after there came by a travelling fiddler, who began to play under the window and beg alms; and when the king heard him, he said,
And when the fiddler, peering into the front room, remarked to the pianist, "It's Burning Daylight," the waltz-time perceptibly quickened, and the dancers, catching the contagion, began to whirl about as if they really enjoyed it.
In came a fiddler with a music-book, and went up to the lofty desk, and made an orchestra of it, and tuned like fifty stomach-aches.
Not a fiddler throughout the length and breadth of Scandinavia played as he did.