Fields


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field

 (fēld)
n.
1.
a. A broad, level, open expanse of land.
b. A meadow: cows grazing in a field.
c. A cultivated expanse of land, especially one devoted to a particular crop: a field of corn.
d. A portion of land or a geologic formation containing a specified natural resource: a copper field.
e. A wide unbroken expanse, as of ice.
2.
a. A battleground.
b. Archaic A battle.
c. The scene or an area of military operations or maneuvers: officers in the field.
3.
a. A background area, as on a flag, painting, or coin: a blue insignia on a field of red.
b. Heraldry The background of a shield or one of the divisions of the background.
4.
a. An area or setting of practical activity or application outside an office, school, factory, or laboratory: biologists working in the field; a product tested in the field.
b. An area or region where business activities are conducted: sales representatives in the field.
5. Sports
a. An area in which an athletic event takes place, especially the area inside or near to a running track, where field events are held.
b. In baseball, the positions on defense or the ability to play defense: She excels in the field.
c. In baseball, one of the three sections of the outfield: He can hit to any field.
6. A range, area, or subject of human activity, interest, or knowledge: several fields of endeavor.
7.
a. The contestants or participants in a competition or athletic event, especially those other than the favorite or winner.
b. The body of riders following a pack of hounds in hunting.
c. The people running in an election for a political office: The field has been reduced to three candidates.
8. Mathematics A set of elements having two operations, designated addition and multiplication, satisfying the conditions that multiplication is distributive over addition, that the set is a group under addition, and that the elements with the exception of the additive identity form a group under multiplication.
9. Physics A region of space characterized by a physical property, such as gravitational or electromagnetic force or fluid pressure, having a determinable value at every point in the region.
10. The usually circular area in which the image is rendered by the lens system of an optical instrument. Also called field of view.
11. Computers
a. An element of a database record in which one piece of information is stored.
b. A space, as on an online form or request for information, that accepts the input of text: an address field.
adj.
1. Growing, cultivated, or living in fields or open land.
2. Made, used, or carried on in the field: field operations.
3. Working, operating, or active in the field: field representatives of a firm.
v. field·ed, field·ing, fields
v.tr.
1.
a. Sports To catch or pick up (a ball) and often make a throw to another player, especially in baseball.
b. To respond to or deal with: fielded tough questions from the press.
2.
a. Sports To place in the playing area: field a team.
b. To nominate in an election: field a candidate.
c. To put into action; deploy: field an army of campaign workers.
3. To enter (data) into a field.
v.intr. Sports
To play as a fielder: How well can he field?
Idiom:
take the field
To begin or resume activity, as in a sport or military operations.

[Middle English feld, from Old English; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: field, bailiwick, domain, province, realm, sphere, territory, turf
These nouns denote an area of activity, thought, study, or interest: the field of comparative literature; considers marketing to be her bailiwick; the domain of physics; the province of politics; the realm of constitutional law; a task within his assistant's sphere; the territory of historical research; bureaucrats interested only in protecting their turf.

Fields

 (fēldz), Dorothy 1905-1974.
American lyricist whose song credits include "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (1930) and "The Way You Look Tonight" (1936), which won an Academy Award.

Fields

, W.C. Originally William Claude Dukenfield. 1880-1946.
American entertainer known for his screen persona as a hard-drinking, cynical misanthrope in films such as My Little Chickadee (1940) and Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941).

Fields

(fiːldz)
n
1. (Biography) Dame Gracie. real name Grace Stansfield. 1898–1979, English popular singer and entertainer
2. (Biography) W. C. real name William Claude Dukenfield. 1880–1946, US film actor, noted for his portrayal of comic roles

Fields

(fildz)

n.
W. C. (William Claude Dukenfield), 1880–1946, U.S. vaudeville and motion-picture comedian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fields - United States comedian and film actor (1880-1946)Fields - United States comedian and film actor (1880-1946)
References in classic literature ?
Bhaer and Jo were enjoying promenades of a different sort, along muddy roads and sodden fields.
Across a long field that had been seeded for clover but that had produced only a dense crop of yellow mustard weeds, he could see the public highway along which went a wagon filled with berry pickers returning from the fields.
There seemed to be nothing to see; no fences, no creeks or trees, no hills or fields.
He told some amusing plantation experiences, recollections of old Iberville and his youth, when he hunted `possum in company with some friendly darky; thrashed the pecan trees, shot the grosbec, and roamed the woods and fields in mischievous idleness.
Before these fields were shorn and till'd, Full to the brim our rivers flow'd; The melody of waters fill'd The fresh and boundless wood; And torrents dash'd, and rivulets play'd, And fountains spouted in the shade.
The children have come from their schools, and the grown people from their workshops and their fields, on purpose to be happy, for, to-day, a new man is beginning to rule over them; and so -- as has been the custom of mankind ever since a nation was first gathered -- they make merry and rejoice: as if a good and golden year were at length to pass over the poor old world
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
where, when seamen fall overboard, they are sometimes found, months afterwards, perpendicularly frozen into the hearts of fields of ice, as a fly is found glued in amber.
Send her out into the fields, and let the cutting frost do for her.
It was not the iceberg itself, as yet, but vast fields cemented by the cold.
Whichever way his thoughts turned they were followed by the somber phantom of the desertion in the fields.
There are no leaves on the trees and hedgerows, but how green all the grassy fields are