Fields


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field

(fēld)
n.
1.
a. A broad, level, open expanse of land.
b. A meadow: cows grazing in a field.
c. A cultivated expanse of land, especially one devoted to a particular crop: a field of corn.
d. A portion of land or a geologic formation containing a specified natural resource: a copper field.
e. A wide unbroken expanse, as of ice.
2.
a. A battleground.
b. Archaic A battle.
c. The scene or an area of military operations or maneuvers: officers in the field.
3.
a. A background area, as on a flag, painting, or coin: a blue insignia on a field of red.
b. Heraldry The background of a shield or one of the divisions of the background.
4.
a. An area or setting of practical activity or application outside an office, school, factory, or laboratory: biologists working in the field; a product tested in the field.
b. An area or region where business activities are conducted: sales representatives in the field.
5. Sports
a. An area in which an athletic event takes place, especially the area inside or near to a running track, where field events are held.
b. In baseball, the positions on defense or the ability to play defense: She excels in the field.
c. In baseball, one of the three sections of the outfield: He can hit to any field.
6. A range, area, or subject of human activity, interest, or knowledge: several fields of endeavor.
7.
a. The contestants or participants in a competition or athletic event, especially those other than the favorite or winner.
b. The body of riders following a pack of hounds in hunting.
c. The people running in an election for a political office: The field has been reduced to three candidates.
8. Mathematics A set of elements having two operations, designated addition and multiplication, satisfying the conditions that multiplication is distributive over addition, that the set is a group under addition, and that the elements with the exception of the additive identity form a group under multiplication.
9. Physics A physical quantity in a region of space, such as gravitational force or fluid pressure, having a distinct value (scalar, vector, or tensor) at each point.
10. The usually circular area in which the image is rendered by the lens system of an optical instrument. Also called field of view.
11. Computers
a. An element of a database record in which one piece of information is stored.
b. A space, as on an online form or request for information, that accepts the input of text: an address field.
adj.
1. Growing, cultivated, or living in fields or open land.
2. Made, used, or carried on in the field: field operations.
3. Working, operating, or active in the field: field representatives of a firm.
v. field·ed, field·ing, fields
v. tr.
1.
a. Sports To catch or pick up (a ball) and often make a throw to another player, especially in baseball.
b. To respond to or deal with: fielded tough questions from the press.
2.
a. Sports To place in the playing area: field a team.
b. To nominate in an election: field a candidate.
c. To put into action; deploy: field an army of campaign workers.
3. To enter (data) into a field.
v. intr. Sports
To play as a fielder: How well can he field?
Idiom:
take the field
To begin or resume activity, as in a sport or military operations.

[Middle English feld, from Old English; see pelə-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: field, bailiwick, domain, province, realm, sphere, territory, turf
These nouns denote an area of activity, thought, study, or interest: the field of comparative literature; considers marketing to be her bailiwick; the domain of physics; the province of politics; the realm of constitutional law; a task within his assistant's sphere; the territory of historical research; bureaucrats interested only in protecting their turf.

Fields

 (fēldz), Dorothy 1905-1974.
American lyricist whose song credits include "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (1930) and "The Way You Look Tonight" (1936), which won an Academy Award.

Fields

, W.C. Originally William Claude Dukenfield. 1880-1946.
American entertainer known for his screen persona as a hard-drinking, cynical misanthrope in films such as My Little Chickadee (1940) and Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941).

Fields

(fiːldz)
n
1. (Biography) Dame Gracie. real name Grace Stansfield. 1898–1979, English popular singer and entertainer
2. (Biography) W. C. real name William Claude Dukenfield. 1880–1946, US film actor, noted for his portrayal of comic roles

Fields

(fildz)

n.
W. C. (William Claude Dukenfield), 1880–1946, U.S. vaudeville and motion-picture comedian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fields - United States comedian and film actor (1880-1946)Fields - United States comedian and film actor (1880-1946)
References in classic literature ?
Fellow-travellers as they rattled by compared it aloud with the fields which they had passed, so that I came to know how I stood in the agricultural world.
You can perhaps hardly understand the effect of that word on a mind like Hetty's, brought up among people who were somewhat hard in their feelings even towards poverty, who lived among the fields, and had little pity for want and rags as a cruel inevitable fate such as they sometimes seem in cities, but held them a mark of idleness and vice--and it was idleness and vice that brought burdens on the parish.
The snow, however, finally disappeared, and the green wheat fields were seen in every direction, spotted with the dark and charred stumps that had, the preceding season, supported some of the proudest trees of the forest.
Across a long field that had been seeded for clover but that had produced only a dense crop of yellow mustard weeds, he could see the public highway along which went a wagon filled with berry pickers returning from the fields.
After a long seclusion she had come to a resolve to undertake outdoor work in her native village, the busiest season of the year in the agricultural world having arrived, and nothing that she could do within the house being so remunerative for the time as harvesting in the fields.
I went down across the fields, and Tony saw me from a long way off.
She dreaded the coming of the workmen to the fields as she was sure they would come.
The chil- dren unable to work in the field had neither shoes, stockings, jackets, nor trousers, given to them; their clothing consisted of two coarse linen shirts per year.
This must be a village of the Field Mice," he said to the Scarecrow.
Nicholas standing in a fallow field could see all his whips.
At the time there was not even a domestic animal in the field.
At midnight we'll start out again, for at dawn tomorrow we must be at the Field of Wonders.