film noir

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film noir

(fĭlm′ nwär′)
n. pl. film noirs (fĭlm′ nwärz′, nwär′) or films noirs (fĭlm′ nwär′)
1. A movie characterized by low-key lighting, a bleak urban setting, and corrupt, cynical characters.
2. The genre or style of such movies.

[French : film, film (from English film; see film) + noir, black (from Old French, from Latin niger, nigr-; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots).]

film noir

(nwɑː)
n
(Film) a gangster thriller, made esp in the 1940s in Hollywood characterized by contrasty lighting and often somewhat impenetrable plots
[C20: French, literally: black film]

film′ noir′


n.
1. a motion picture genre marked by grim urban settings, cynical, bleakly pessimistic characters, and starkly shadowed photography.
2. a motion picture in this genre.
[1955–60; < French: literally, black film]

film noir

1. A French phrase meaning black film, used to mean the type of moody gangster movies made in the 1940s.
2. Moody style of gangster or thriller film, often shot in dark contrasting images.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.film noir - a movie that is marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, menace, and cynical characters; "film noir was applied by French critics to describe American thriller or detective films in the 1940s"
motion picture, motion-picture show, movie, moving picture, moving-picture show, pic, film, picture show, flick, picture - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"
References in periodicals archive ?
The action alternates between the hospital ward and the postwar surreal film-noir world he is creating.
Bogarde is at his subtle best in what amounts to a film-noir detective role, scouting down the fellow targets of a blackmailing ring who are joined in grief for a young man brought down by the scheme (Peter McEnery, whose gay role would not inhibit Disney from promoting him to the romantic lead in The Moon-Spinners).
4) A new print of the film-noir masterpiece ``The Third Man,'' co-starring Joseph Cotten, left, and Orson Welles, is showing at the Nuart for the picture's 50th anniversary.