Fine Gael

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Fine Gael

(ˈfɪnə ˈɡɛːl)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) one of the major political parties in the Republic of Ireland, formed in 1933
[from Irish Gaelic fine tribe, race + Gael of the Gaels]
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References in periodicals archive ?
A member of Ireland's ruling Fine Gael party, parliamentarian Colm Brophy, said: "I utterly condemn this mindless criminal behaviour that has been carried out in recent hours.
The Taoiseach paid a glowing tribute to the former Fine Gael party leader as the 74-year-old was honoured in his native Limerick with a lifetime achievement award.
Opposition party Fianna Fail, which last year agreed to abstain in key votes to allow Prime Minister Leo Varadkar's Fine Gael party to form a government, called on deputy prime minister Frances Fitzgerald to resign.
Leo Varadkar, 38, was formally elected Taoiseach - Prime Minister of Ireland- at a confirmation ceremony in the Dail in Dublin after he won the Fine Gael party leadership earlier this month.
This has been a wonderful exercise in democracy for the Fine Gael party.
IRELAND is on the cusp of electing its first gay premier after the ruling Fine Gael party revealed its new leader Leo Varadkar.
DPA London Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny resigned as head of the ruling Fine Gael party on Wednesday, paving the way for him to be replaced as the country's leader.
Kenny's center-right Fine Gael party is set to fall about 30 seats short of the 80 needed to form a majority in parliament with counting almost complete, leaving its historic rival as the only obvious partner to form a stable government.
Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said Sunday that his Fine Gael party would not return to power in a coalition with Labour after waning support for both parties meant that they could not form a majority.
DUBLIN, Jumada I 11, 1437, Feb 20, 2016, SPA -- Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny's Fine Gael party recovered from a recent slide in popularity in two opinion polls on Saturday but his junior coalition partners fell to their lowest ever level six days from a national election, Reuters reported.
What is interesting, however, is Meehan's suggestion that as much credit for the failure goes to the weaknesses of Fine Gael party organization, as to the strength of the Catholic Church--a view of the party that recurs throughout the book.
Following the 2011 election, the conservative Fine Gael party, which had been solidly pro-life, entered a coalition government with the secularist Labour Party, the same party which closed the Irish Embassy to the Holy See in 2011, and is pushing for half of all Catholic schools in Ireland to be turned over to the government.