firms


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firm 1

 (fûrm)
adj. firm·er, firm·est
1. Resistant to externally applied pressure.
2. Marked by or indicating the tone and resiliency of healthy tissue: firm muscles.
3. Securely fixed in place: Despite being hit by the car, the post was still firm.
4. Indicating or possessed of determination or resolution: a firm voice.
5. Constant; steadfast: a firm ally.
6.
a. Not subject to change; fixed and definite: a firm bargain; a firm offer.
b. Unfluctuating; steady: Stock prices are still firm.
7. Strong and sure: a firm grasp.
tr. & intr.v. firmed, firm·ing, firms
To make or become firm. Often used with up.
adv. firmer, firmest
Without wavering; resolutely: stand firm.

[Middle English ferm, from Old French, from Latin firmus; see dher- in Indo-European roots.]

firm′ly adv.
firm′ness n.

firm 2

 (fûrm)
n.
1. A business enterprise.
2. An unincorporated business, particularly a partnership.
3. The name or designation under which a company transacts business.

[Italian firma, from firmare, to ratify by signature, from Medieval Latin firmāre, from Latin, to confirm, from firmus, firm; see dher- in Indo-European roots.]
References in classic literature ?
In half an hour there was a board meeting; later, he was to hold a post mortem on a railroad; at every moment questions were being asked by telegraph, by cable, questions that involved the credit of individuals, of firms, of even the country.
He had learned by this time that Packingtown was really not a number of firms at all, but one great firm, the Beef Trust.
Before a fortnight was over, Baxter admitted ruefully that M'Leod was better than most firms in the business: We buyers were coy, argumentative, shocked at the price of Holmescroft, inquisitive, and cold by turns, but Mr.
The division of the upper clerks of staunch firms, or of the "steady old fellows," it was not possible to mistake.
In London at the present moment there exist some thousands of respectable, neatly-dressed, mechanical, unenterprising young men, employed at modest salaries by various banks, corporations, stores, shops, and business firms.
As for these keys, they were clever counterfeits of typical patterns by two great safe-making firms.
Neither the Vicar nor his wife knew in the least what this was, and Philip had never heard of anyone being a chartered accountant; but another letter from the solicitor explained that the growth of modern businesses and the increase of companies had led to the formation of many firms of accountants to examine the books and put into the financial affairs of their clients an order which old-fashioned methods had lacked.
Through a cousin who works with Gelder, he found out the retail firms who had bought the busts.
Hill with his control of the Northwest; (2) the Pennsylvania railway group, Schiff financial manager, with big banking firms of Philadelphia and New York; (3) Harriman, with Frick for counsel and Odell as political lieutenant, controlling the central continental, Southwestern and Southern Pacific Coast lines of transportation;
Report described him to me as having made considerable sums of money in that way, for a man in his position; serving firms, you know, with a bad name, and running all sorts of desperate risks.
There is yet, in the Temple, something of a clerkly monkish atmosphere, which public offices of law have not disturbed, and even legal firms have failed to scare away.
That's the reason I can wear good broadcloth now, and have my legs under the same table with the head of the best firms in St.