Fischer von Erlach


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Fischer von Erlach

(German ˈfɪʃər fɔn ˈerlax)
n
(Biography) Johann Bernhard (joˈhan ˈbernhart). 1656–1723, Austrian architect: a leading exponent of the German baroque
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Fischer von Erlach placed not one but two in front of his Karlskirche in Vienna during the 1730s.
Few architects have so shaped cities' appearances as the Austrian Empire's Fischer von Erlach (1656 1723).
Though Hawksmoor left no body of theory to explain works such as St George's, Bloomsbury, and St Mary Woolnoth, Hart describes his intellectual interests and theoretical sources, drawing especially on his letters and on his library with its books on logic, law, metaphysics, natural history, and mathematics, its works by Fischer von Erlach and Descartes, its exotic travel literature, and its engravings of Baroque Rome by Falda, de Rossi, and Fontana.
The interior of the adjacent mausoleum (1614) was designed by Pietro de Pomise and enhanced at the beginning of the eighteenth century by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, a native Grazer who was Austria's grand master of Baroque design.
The Fischer von Erlach Wing, which fronts the whole complex, has been thoroughly renovated and dubbed "Quartier 21.
At the Karlskirche in Vienna, Fischer von Erlach erected a billboard of interlocking political and religious references perfectly intelligible in its day.
The first, Fischer von Erlach, was responsible for the Schonbrunn Palace, the Church of St.
Situated on the premises of former hunting grounds, the Baroque palace, completed in 1713, was a more simple version of the plans that Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, who at that time was tutor in civil architecture to the future Emperor Joseph I, presented to Emperor Leopold I.
Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach is a key figure of the Austrian Baroque.
Its scale and scope is unique: some 450 pages of text, 150 of notes, and 70 of classified biography, plus 200 illustrations, take us from Vitruvius to Venturi, tracing the route by which, say, the odd speculations of Juan Bautista Villalpando (Kruft's upward reassessment of Spanish theory is particularly welcome) find their way into the writings and work of Salomon de Bray, Fischer von Erlach, Pratt, Wren and Wood the Elder.