flatfoot

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flat·foot

 (flăt′fo͝ot′)
n.
1. pl. flat·feet (-fēt′) A condition in which the arch of the foot is abnormally flattened down so that the entire sole makes contact with the ground.
2. pl. flat·foots
a. Informal A person with flat feet.
b. Slang A police officer.
intr.v. flat·foot·ed, flat·foot·ing, flat·foots
To walk in a flat-footed manner: "He flatfooted along, twirling his club" (James T. Farrell).

flatfoot

(ˈflætˌfʊt)
npl -foots or -feet
1. (Pathology) Also called: splayfoot a condition in which the entire sole of the foot is able to touch the ground because of flattening of the instep arch
2. (Law) a slang word (usually derogatory) for a policeman

flat•foot

(ˈflætˌfʊt or, for 1, -ˈfʊt)

n., pl. -feet for 1, -foots for 2,3.
1.
a. a condition in which the arch of the foot is flattened so that the entire sole rests upon the ground.
b. Also, flat′ foot′. a foot with such an arch.
2. Slang. a police officer; cop.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given regionflatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given region
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.flatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen archflatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen arch; abnormally flattened and spread out
foot, human foot, pes - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"

flatfoot

noun
Slang. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
Translations

flat·foot

, flat-foot
n. pie plano.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most physically challenging piece on the program, Short Dances/Little Stories, performed to hip-hop and rap, is unforgiving in its rapid changes in level and percussive gestures (a double pirouette into a flat-foot stop; leg gestures en croix and then coming to a full stop).
A flat-foot action will induce a greater jumping action over the hurdle that will hamper the fluid trajectory over the hurdle.