flatworm

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flat·worm

 (flăt′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various parasitic and nonparasitic worms of the phylum Platyhelminthes, such as a tapeworm or a planarian, characteristically having a soft, flat, bilaterally symmetrical body and no body cavity. Also called platyhelminth.

flatworm

(ˈflætˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any parasitic or free-living invertebrate of the phylum Platyhelminthes, including planarians, flukes, and tapeworms, having a flattened body with no circulatory system and only one opening to the intestine

plat•y•hel•minth

(ˌplæt ɪˈhɛl mɪnθ)

n.
any of various unsegmented worms of the phylum Platyhelminthes, with a soft, flattened body, including the tapeworm, planarian, and trematode. Also called flatworm.
[1875–80; < New Latin Platyhelmintha flatworm. See platy-, helminth]
plat`y•hel•min′thic, adj.

flat·worm

(flăt′wûrm′)
Any of various worms having a flat, unsegmented body that is bilaterally symmetrical. Many flatworms, such as the tapeworm, are parasites. Also called platyhelminth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatworm - parasitic or free-living worms having a flattened bodyflatworm - parasitic or free-living worms having a flattened body
flame cell - organ of excretion in flatworms
worm - any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae
planaria, planarian - free-swimming mostly freshwater flatworms; popular in laboratory studies for the ability to regenerate lost parts
trematode, trematode worm, fluke - parasitic flatworms having external suckers for attaching to a host
cestode, tapeworm - ribbonlike flatworms that are parasitic in the intestines of humans and other vertebrates
Translations

flatworm

[ˈflætwɜːm] Nplatelminto m

flatworm

[ˈflætˌwɜːm] nverme m piatto, platelminta m

flat·worm

n. gusano plano que se aloja en los intestinos.

flatworm

n gusano plano
References in periodicals archive ?
Even amongst planarian flatworms, famous for their ability to regenerate from random tissue fragments, species exist that have completely lost the ability to regenerate.
Schistosomiasis, caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, is one of the most significant neglected tropical diseases, causing serious public health problems in more than 70 tropical and subtropical countries (Gryseels et al.
Professor Hoffmann said: "We are incredibly pleased that the Wellcome Trust has selected our team to develop these cutting-edge resources, which will revolutionise our ability to study and manipulate parasitic flatworms including blood flukes and tapeworms.
FLATWORMS have fascinated me for more than half a century.
A new biological study will use flatworms as a model organism to see how gravity affects tissue regeneration and the rebuilding of damaged organs and nerves.
Trematode flatworms clonally form colonies in their molluscan first intermediate hosts, and some species have a reproductive and a soldier caste.
Elsewhere, researchers trained tiny flatworms to respond preemptively to a stimulus by curling up in anticipation of an electric shock rather than stretching out in the presence of light, as is instinctive for them.
We sought to determine if cues were released when flatworms are subjected to a treatment that more closely resembles predation or when they are suffer stress with no tissue damage.
The study looked at sexual behaviours in male mammals, birds, fish, insects and flatworms and has found that males only traded-off investment in weapons and testes when they were sure that females wouldn't fool around with another male when their back was turned.
From the Greek opisthen (behind) and orchis (testicle), Opisthorchis is a genus of trematode flatworms whose testes are located in the posterior end of the body.
In major marine invertebrate groups, C value variations have been reported as 125-fold in nematodes, 340-fold in flatworms, 130-fold in annelids, 18-fold in molluscs, 460-fold in crustaceans, and 8-fold in echinoderms (Gregory 2012; Animal Genome Size Database).
The sea world certainly has interesting sex and copulation behaviour among its creatures such as flatworms that fence with their penises