flavonoid

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fla·vo·noid

 (flā′və-noid′)
n.
1. Any of a large group of water-soluble antioxidant compounds, including the anthocyanins, flavonols, flavones, and isoflavonoids, often occurring as glycosides in plants and consisting of two aromatic rings linked by a carbon bridge that often forms a heterocyclic ring. Flavonoids are found in tea, red wine, and a variety of vegetables and fruits.
2. Any of various compounds that are a subset of this group, including the flavones, flavanols, and flavonols, as distinguished from the isoflavonoids. In both senses also called bioflavonoid.

flavonoid

(ˈfleɪvəˌnɔɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any of a group of organic compounds that occur as pigments in fruit and flowers
[C20: from flavone + -oid]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flavonoid - any of a large class of plant pigments having a chemical structure based on or similar to flavone
phytochemical - a chemical substance obtained from plants that is biologically active but not nutritive
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)
Translations

flavonoid

n flavonoide m
References in periodicals archive ?
A study involving 10,000 people found that regular apple eaters had a 50% lower risk of developing lung cancer thanks to certain flavonoids they contain.
A recent study suggests that flavonoids are associated with a lower risk of ovarian cancer.
Research: The impact of different dietary flavonoid subclasses on risk of epithelial ovarian cancer is unclear, with limited previous studies that have focused on only a few compounds.
A 21% lower risk of both stroke incidence and mortality from stroke was observed among those with high tea intake in comparison with low, and for those with a high intake of flavonoids, the risk was 20% lower.
High intakes of the flavonoids are linked to lower insulin resistance and better control of blood sugar, a study has shown.
Washington, August 31 ( ANI ): Scientists have discovered that very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids may affect immune system of humans in a much bigger way.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Celery, artichokes, and herbs, especially Mexican oregano, all contain apigenin and luteolin, flavonoids that kill human pancreatic cancer cells in the lab by inhibiting an important enzyme, according to two new University of Illinois studies.
Quercetin and rutin are common flavonoids in fruit and vegetables, and have been reported to affect bone development.
Areas explored include preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics, as well as toxicology and safety of flavonoids and their possible drug interactions.
In laboratory and clinical research various flavonoids have demonstrated the ability to improve endothelial function by exerting anti-inflammatory effects, inhibiting low-density lipoprotein oxidation and endothelial NADPH oxidase, modulating nitric oxide synthase activity/ expression and augmenting nitric oxide status.
The berries have rich levels of compounds called dietary flavonoids, found in foods such as dark chocolate, grapes, red wine, blackberries and eggplant.
Besides being edible and fragrant, they all contain high amounts of flavonoids, a group of phytochemicals well studied for their link to fighting cancer.