Florence


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Flor·ence

 (flôr′əns, flŏr′-) also Fi·ren·ze (fē-rĕn′dzĕ)
A city of central Italy on the Arno River east of Pisa. Originally an Etruscan settlement, then a Roman town, Florence was a powerful city-state under the Medici family during the Italian Renaissance, with a brilliant artistic flowering led by Giotto, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Dante Alighieri, and Raphael. Florence was the capital of newly unified Italy from 1865 to 1871, when the government was moved to Rome.

Florence

(ˈflɒrəns)
n
(Placename) a city in central Italy, on the River Arno in Tuscany: became an independent republic in the 14th century; under Austrian and other rule intermittently from 1737 to 1859; capital of Italy 1865–70. It was the major cultural and artistic centre of the Renaissance and is still one of the world's chief art centres. Pop: 356 118 (2001). Ancient name: Florentia Italian name: Firenze

Flor•ence

(ˈflɔr əns, ˈflɒr-)

n.
a city in Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River. 421,299. Italian, Firenze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Florence - a city in central Italy on the ArnoFlorence - a city in central Italy on the Arno; provincial capital of Tuscany; center of the Italian Renaissance from 14th to 16th centuries
Toscana, Tuscany - a region in central Italy
Florentine - a native or resident of Florence, Italy
2.Florence - a town in northeast South Carolina; transportation center
Palmetto State, SC, South Carolina - a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies
Translations
Firenze
Firenze
Florencja

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] NFlorencia f

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] nFlorence

Florence

nFlorenz nt

Florence

[ˈflɒrns] nFirenze f
References in classic literature ?
In Florence he had discovered the Correggio he had been sent to find.
I afterward visited the great galleries of Rome and Florence for the same purpose.
You shall sojourn at Paris, Rome, and Naples: at Florence, Venice, and Vienna: all the ground I have wandered over shall be re-trodden by you: wherever I stamped my hoof, your sylph's foot shall step also.
She looked, indeed, like one of those wonderful boys of the Italian Renaissance, whom you may still see at the National Gallery, whose beauty is no denial, but rather the stamp of their slender, supple strength, young painters and sculptors who held the palette for Leonardo, or wielded the chisel for Michelangelo, and anon threw both aside to take up sword for Guelf or Ghibelline in the narrow streets of Florence.
Give it here, gossip, for I make more account of having found it than if they had given me a cassock of Florence stuff.
Because I was arrested at Piombino, and I presume that, like Milan and Florence, Piombino has become the capital of some French department.
Machiavelli was the accredited agent of the Florentine Republic to Cesare Borgia (1478-1507) during the transactions which led up to the assassinations of the Orsini and Vitelli at Sinigalia, and along with his letters to his chiefs in Florence he has left an account, written ten years before "The Prince," of the proceedings of the duke in his "Descritione del modo tenuto dal duca Valentino nello ammazzare Vitellozzo Vitelli," etc.
The action takes place at Florence in the early sixteenth century.
Cosmus, duke of Florence, had a desperate saying against perfidious or neglecting friends, as if those wrongs were unpardonable; You shall read (saith he) that we are commanded to forgive our enemies; but you never read, that we are commanded to forgive our friends.
It was pleasant to wake up in Florence, to open the eyes upon a bright bare room, with a floor of red tiles which look clean though they are not; with a painted ceiling whereon pink griffins and blue amorini sport in a forest of yellow violins and bassoons.
Or, if passengers desire to visit Parma (famous for Correggio's frescoes) and Bologna, they can by rail go on to Florence, and rejoin the steamer at Leghorn, thus spending about three weeks amid the cities most famous for art in Italy.
He was also a good deal in debt: it was difficult to live in London like a gentleman on three hundred a year; and his heart yearned for the Venice and Florence which John Ruskin had so magically described.