country blues

(redirected from Folk-blues)

country blues

n
(Music, other) (sometimes functioning as singular) acoustic folk blues with a guitar accompaniment. Compare urban blues
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AUDIENCES of award-winning folk-blues guitarist and songwriter Sunjay Brayne can never quite believe their ears.
There are original compositions as well as interpretations of Thelonious Monk's "Little Rootie Tootie,'' the Rodgers & Hart standard "My Romance,'' and the traditional folk-blues classic "House of the Rising Sun.
He lived in New York in the 60s, then spent his gap year in Paris and gravitated to the folk-blues scene in Massachusetts.
NEW Orleans-raised Chris Smither is a finger-pickin', foot-stompin' folk-blues master whose songs pack a keen sardonic wit.
THE regular 12 Bar Blues Club welcomes another guest performer, this time a folk-blues ragtime guitarist from New York.
THE name may mean little or nothing to you, but folk-blues singer Karen Dalton was hugely influential back in the 1960s, her coffee shop gigs inspiring such later luminaries as Fred Neil, Tim Hardin and Bob Dylan.
She performed her own attractive folk-blues songs in a languidly emotional style and showed great technical command of her instrument in imaginatively realised versions of tunes from the British tradition.
The result was ``Louis XIV,'' a gritty record inspired by the early folk-blues of Lightnin' Hopkins and Blind Willie McTell ``and all these heroes of mine,'' Hill says.
DURING the early 1960's Britain experienced a massive Folk-Blues revival.
Smither and the smoky Vermont singer Louise Taylor will host an evening of folk-blues starting at 8 p.
It was fake for young rocker Dylan to become a folkie, fake for folkie Dylan to become a rocker, fake for rocker Dylan to become a country squire, fake for protest Dylan to become a poet of amphetamine-driven Beat wordplay and internalized reflections on romance, fake for superstar Dylan to become a vagabond minstrel with his 1975-76 Rolling Thunder tour, fake for secular Jew Dylan to become a vengeance-spouting born-again Christian, fake for that born-again Christian to return to secular pop and tour with the Grateful Dead, fake for rock star Dylan to return to acoustic folk-blues roots in the early '90s, and fake for a washed-up zombie to release one of the most vital records of his career, Time Out of Mind (1997), after knock, knock, knockin' on heaven's door with a heart infection.
Young blacks lost track of their folk-blues heritage and the music became the darling of the white folks.