fopling

fopling

(ˈfɒplɪŋ)
n
a vain, affected person
References in classic literature ?
Again, to mark the nice distinction between two persons actuated by the same vice or folly is another; and, as this last talent is found in very few writers, so is the true discernment of it found in as few readers; though, I believe, the observation of this forms a very principal pleasure in those who are capable of the discovery; every person, for instance, can distinguish between Sir Epicure Mammon and Sir Fopling Flutter; but to note the difference between Sir Fopling Flutter and Sir Courtly Nice requires a more exquisite judgment: for want of which, vulgar spectators of plays very often do great injustice in the theatre; where I have sometimes known a poet in danger of being convicted as a thief, upon much worse evidence than the resemblance of hands hath been held to be in the law.
A rhyme reads: "Sir Fopling Flutter through his glass/Inspects the ladies as they pass/Yet still the coxcomb lacks the wit/To guard against the bailiff''s writ.
In its extended sense, he contends, rhyme is integral to the wit of Marvell's prose as well, where Marvell's animadversions supply necessary rebounds and where rhymes in character--Samuel Parker as a representation of Dryden and Francis Turner as an amalgam of Dorimant and Sir Fopling Flutter--are possible.
Perhaps inspired by Etherege's Sir Fopling Flutter from The Man of Mode and other similar period characters, Stephen Pelinski's Prince of Aragon was the perfect eighteenth-century fop, with an exaggerated cape that he whipped around for stylish effect, and red heels with large blue bows.
George Etherege's The Man of Mode; or, Sir Fopling Flutter, premiering at the Duke's Theatre in 1676, remained popular with audiences until the 1750s, and was then "dropped from the repertory" apparently because "changing tastes made its sexual frankness seem objectionable" (O'Neill 526).
Dorimant Tom Hardy Medley Bertie Carvel Bellair Amit Shah Sir Fopling Flutter Rory Kinnear Mrs.
And where else might Robins or her listeners run across titles like A Chaste Maid in Cheapside or Sir Fopling Flutter?
The plays are Thomas Shadwell's The Libertine, Sir George Etherege's The Man of Mode; or, Sir Fopling Flutter, Thomas Durfey's A Fond Husband; or, The Plotting Sisters and Thomas Otway's Friendship in Fashion.
There he calls the character Sir Fopling Flutter everything and nothing: "Legion's his name, a people in a Man" (Works, 1:154).
Playwrights declared themselves against affected wit and acquired follies and satirized these qualities in caricature characters with label-like names such as Sir Fopling Flutter (in Sir George Etherege's The Man of Mode, 1676) and Tattle (in William Congreve's The Old Bachelour, 1693).
Sir Fopling is a fool who imagines that a fine Parisian suit of clothes and a few French phrases will make him admired in London.